Melting meteors

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meteorB
Posts: 82
Joined: Mon Apr 22, 2013 7:46 pm
Location: Kilwinning, North Ayrshire.
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Melting meteors

Post by meteorB »

Hi,

There have been reports of "fuzzy" meteors for a long time. In the literature these are often referred to as "dustballs".

Recently I have started to record quite a number of these. I think this is simply due to the technology being able to record such things now.

Due to the nature of these meteors one really needs to see the videos to appreciate how they seem to dissolve to nothing. This is quite different to the usual, more rapid disappearence of the majority of meteors recorded by video.

Here are some examples.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eppOe5sJymk
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rKEydn4lTZ8
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-thc7_H4F6c

cheers,
Bill.
David1952
Posts: 32
Joined: Tue Oct 23, 2012 10:16 am
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Re: Melting meteors

Post by David1952 »

Bill,

Do you see the effect only with the latest most sensitive cameras? I am using a GW902H which is a bit long in the tooth now, but I will have a look back through my records. If I find any I will pass them across.

Have you any idea as to how common they are? 1 in a 100, 1 in a 1000 etc.

It would by nice to get a spectrum to see if there is anything different in the makeup, which might cause this brightness profile.

Regards

David
meteorB
Posts: 82
Joined: Mon Apr 22, 2013 7:46 pm
Location: Kilwinning, North Ayrshire.
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Re: Melting meteors

Post by meteorB »

Hi,
At this stage I'm not sure.

I have only started to "notice" them since I started using the latest Watec 910's
With the older 902's I've certainly seen "fuzzy" and sometimes quite indistinct meteors but I can't say they grabbed my attention quite like these "melting" ones. I think it's the case of the cameras being sufficiently sensitive to record the whole event, more or less.

Initially I was concerned that it might be some sort of instrumental effect but having recorded several now along with the usual collection of regular meteors I'm confident they're real. The fascinating thing is how they elongate as they finally disintegrate.

As for a spectrum, indeed it would be nice but so far I've not picked any of the dissolving ones in the right part of the frame or bright enough to give a decent spectrum.

If you do catch any I'd be very interested to compare notes!

cheers,
Bill.
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