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 Post subject: Spacewalk
PostPosted: Sat Mar 05, 2011 4:56 pm 
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A nice photo as appeared in yesterday's press...

http://www.thesun.co.uk/sol/homepage/ne ... arden.html

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PostPosted: Sun Mar 06, 2011 10:49 am 
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Congratulations to Martin Lewis on a tremendous photo.
Various questions arise from this photo. One can see the robotic arm and also various glints on the Shuttle and ISS. I find even more impressive the detail of the shuttle and the robotic arm.
There are various aspects to the photo. The dirsct detail of the ISS and Shuttle and the glints.
Glints are from spherical surfaces or suurfaces of part of a sphere. Cylindrical surfaces and flat surfaces.
And glints from more complex curved surfaces.
The glints from the flat surfaces of say the iridium satellites can be very bright but over a limited area, and these are images of part of the Sun.
All the satellites we see are usually just reflections of the Sun.
I presume that if the glint in the photo of the spacewalker is from the helmet this is part of a sphere.

It has been known for some time that ground based scopes about 60 inch aperture using adaptive optics can capture very detailed views of objects at the ISS height.

On 24 feb at 13.37UT I took 4 images of I think an Airbus 319 with a Canon a720 IS at 6x optical 4a digital zoom compact camera. There are two frames with circular glints from the front of the aircraft and another two with glints from the rear of the fuselage. This confused me, but I think they are glints from external window glass? I suppose rather than a plastic. I suppose these are fairly flat and I am seeing an image of part of the Sun rather than the whole Sun, but I am still not sure why the glints are circular. They could be out of focus glints from non flat windows,
.
A few days earliee I got similar circular glints from I think an aircraft's windows and a very elongated glint fro the front fuselage.
The Airbus A319 was about two miles distant.

Suiter's book on telescope optics discusses glints in relation to star tests using ball bearings and spherical christmas tree ornaments one to three inch diameter and gives the sizes of the Sun's image in them, and I presume you could also work out the brightness of the glints.

Regards, David.


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PostPosted: Wed Mar 09, 2011 7:31 pm 
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Location: Sheffield (53° 21' N 1° 12' W)
Hi,
Discovery's final mission is complete.

Perfect landing. If you missed it here it is ..

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I1gXFroaFSE

All the best
Dave

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PostPosted: Thu Mar 10, 2011 10:23 am 
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Davej wrote:
Hi,
Discovery's final mission is complete.

Perfect landing. If you missed it here it is ..

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I1gXFroaFSE

All the best
Dave

Morning Dave,i watched it on the BBC,a good landing, i noticed on the BBC's footage the shadow of the shuttle on the tarmac,just before she touched down,for some reason that is what i'll remember of Discoverys last flight. :cry:
andy

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PostPosted: Tue Mar 29, 2011 1:47 pm 
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David,

A lot of long haul flights these days are changing over to the new Boeing 777s which are two engine aircraft - these usually have a cruising altitude of around 35,000ft, so you probably are seeing more long haul flights than you suspect.

Tim

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Mar 29, 2011 2:26 pm 
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Dear Tim,
There are various Boeing 777s. Amazingly the 777 200 can use Luton's short runaway and have done for a year or more. They have a range of 4,000 miles or so depending on weight. The long range 777s can fly up to about 16 hours. There are also long range 767 ERs.
I can recognise both these. The 777 is easily rdcognisable from its wing shape. The 767 is more difficult as it resembles the smaller 737s and Airbus 320 series.
There are also long range larger airbuses, All these aircraft have two engines. The enormous Airbus A380 still looks ver impressive at 35,000 feet and the engines are further apart than the Boeing 747.
The 737s often cruise at 41,000ft, even 43,000feet but one can generally tell them from there size. The winglets on Boeing and Airbuses are quite different.
Unfortunately some older aircraft are fitted with new fit winglets to reduce fuel costs and increase performance so things are difficult to rcognise.
The business jet fly at 51,000 feet so can get direct routings as they are above normal commercial traffic.

Sorry this is off topic.
But it has been cloudy most of the day except my 06.49UT PST observation. Also rain but seenms to brightening now so may manage a proper PST observation. The Sun is certainly busy.

Regards, David.


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 29, 2011 10:01 pm 
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David,

Sorry for correcting you, and I may have mis-read your paragraph but

A318,A319,A320,A321 short haul (2 engines)
A300,A310,A330 Medium-long haul (2 engines)
A340,A380 long haul (4 engines)

Regards Andy


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Mar 29, 2011 10:14 pm 
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Dear Andy,
You are of course correct.
I phrased my piece badly as I didn't want it to be too long.
Also the Boing 757 and the russian copy are twin engined.
I think the 318 is in fact the old MD 80, 90 series. I will have to look this up.
Of course the a380 and 747 are 4 engined, but at height the A380 is much larger than 747 and contrails further apart as engine separation bigger.
I once saw a 5 engined 747. There is room inboard for an extra engine on a pylon for shipping purposes.
There are of course numerous other types big and small.

Cloudy here today most of the day so no astronomy.

Regards, David.

I have never seen the 747 with I think a very large telescope in it, as a very high flying observatory.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Mar 29, 2011 10:20 pm 
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Apologies for the change of topic to original thread but the A318 is the extra shortened version of the A320. The Boeing 717 is the MD80/DC9 with 2 engines at the rear of the fuselage.


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 29, 2011 10:24 pm 
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Thanks for that Andy,
The Virgin Atlantic very long 4 engined 600 series looks ridiculously long and I personally would not want to fly in it.
It is the only aircraft that I have photographed the serial number with my compact camera.
Sorry if this is off topic, forgive us.

David.

That is flying overhead for the Virgin Atlantic aircraft.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Mar 29, 2011 10:30 pm 
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Back on thread.

I read today that they have started breaking up Discovery in the last couple of days, ready to be in a position to hand over to one of the US museums vying for it.

That will be definitely worth seeing wherever it goes.


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PostPosted: Wed Mar 30, 2011 12:53 pm 
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I read that too, Andy. One of the Museums vying for it is apparently an old aircraft carrier moored in New York - looked an interesting place. I tried to find the piece again to post a link but can't find it now (I could have sworn I read it on the BBC, but nevermind).

Tim

ps - trying not to venture off topic again, but can't help myself: I'm not a fan of the 777, not a very comfortable plane to fly on - esp. in economy, all the loos are right at the back, but not many people realise this so there's always huge queues at the only one that is situated midway. Right, that's it - I promise not to go off topic here anymore!

I hope I might get a chance to see the ISS and Endeavour pass overhead when it happens - very interested to read the last thread about Discovery and the ISS in Feb. Sadly I was away and so unable to attempt to see it. Looks like this will be our last chance - I hope the UK is favourably placed for night passes again this time ...

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Mar 30, 2011 2:18 pm 
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Dear Tim,
The aircraft carrier is probably the one with the SR71 and loads of other aircraft on it. It would look very nice if a Space Shuttle was also on board.
I think the Concorde is nearby on its own barge, although it might now also be on board.
I suppose if you bring up a satellite image of New York you would find it by going around the river shores.
America has wonderful large museums. I never got to see where they keep all the Apollo and other rockets.

Regards, David


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PostPosted: Wed Mar 30, 2011 2:25 pm 
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Andyjasper wrote:
Back on thread.

I read today that they have started breaking up Discovery in the last couple of days, ready to be in a position to hand over to one of the US museums vying for it.

That will be definitely worth seeing wherever it goes.


Hi Andy,
Hope the technicians aren't too hard on such a wonderful craft.

http://www.space.com/11131-space-shuttl ... onian.html

All the best
Dave

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Mar 30, 2011 4:50 pm 
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Dear David,

I found a link to the museum at least, if not the news piece I saw (which had a nice picture of all the aircraft on deck). The museum is the Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum:

http://www.intrepidmuseum.org/

They have a campaign page for their bid to get the shuttle placed there.

Regards,

Tim

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