Sutherland satellite launch site legal challenge

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Lariliss
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Re: Sutherland satellite launch site legal challenge

Post by Lariliss »

SpaceX is not alone in pushing to launch large numbers of internet satellites (though it is the largest one with announcing 2.5% of failures, which is quite a big number for 14,000), climate surveillance satellites have planned intense missions as well.
Only part of the satellite constellations is low orbit ones, that should be taken into account.
At the same time, the timelines of the launch missions are incredibly tight. Taking into account the advantages of data-engineering, saving time for the engineering designs, there is still the time that cannot be saved: engine and launch testing. The advanced technology is mature enough, that's why probably the best solution is keep o with the timelines and make adjustments on the way.
Space junk and low orbit payload is already a hazard, in the same way as we understand ocean and atmosphere pollution.
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JohnM
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Re: Sutherland satellite launch site legal challenge

Post by JohnM »

SpaceX seem to be more transparent about what they are doing than other companies though there is still a lot of information they have not released like the shape & reflectance model so it is not possible to calculate the brightness accurately.

The newer SpaceX satellites are all in low orbit to minimise the time delays - the high orbit (batch 1 ?) seem to be being de-orbited.

OneWeb say very little about what they are doing - I only stumbled on the fact they recently launched a whole batch of satellites while I was hunting for the Landsat-9 orbit parameters.

We have no idea of how bright the OneWeb satellites are - at least from OneWeb which is why they do not appear on the Heaven's Above bright satellite summary.

The only data we have on how bright they are comes from a telescope in Russia that measures the orbits & brightness of satellites as they pass over Russia. They have brightness measurements for all visible satellites except for Russian ones that are suppressed.

John
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Lariliss
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Re: Sutherland satellite launch site legal challenge

Post by Lariliss »

There is a lot of data available publicly for the satellites observations, being contributed with amateur ones as well, like SatNOGS, and for sure many satellite observation communities.
Starlink is in the spotlight due to the scale of the mission for the one leading company. And it had issued the satellites albedo decrease due to the number of satellites and light pollution impact.
Satellite flare have different magnitudes, according to their material, size and path.
There are practical implementations even for wooden satellites for the sake of the atmosphere pollution while burning from orbit.
Number, Letter, Note: Know, Think, Dream.
Lariliss
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Re: Sutherland satellite launch site legal challenge

Post by Lariliss »

Here is an interesting article, which tells us about all aspects of the light pollution from satellites. A bit long read, but I found it worth it.

https://www.science.org/content/article ... id=3949611

There are clear aims for the amount of satellites launches: the internet (with all its educational, survival aims), surveillance (vital on the Globe scale and for the endangered ecosystems), climate change surveillance essentials.
All possible international communities involvement, struggling to eliminate the issue are in the process.
Light pollution is an obstacle for many essential observations, data collection, the Earth protection from space hazards. That's why there is no surprise. International measures implementation will take time, but the process of technological solutions is undergoing.
Number, Letter, Note: Know, Think, Dream.
JohnM
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Re: Sutherland satellite launch site legal challenge

Post by JohnM »

During the RAS live observing URANUS broadcast this weekend there was an interview with members of the Bath Astronomical Society. They have 5 Meteor detection cameras that observe the night sky looking for meteor trails and possible meteorites such as the Winchcombe fall.

One morning recently they were surprised that when they checked the log files that they had detected 450 meteors overnight. As you might have guessed Bath had been photobombed by the recent Starlink satellite launch. They did not give sufficient details to allow me to work out how high & how bright the satellites were. I can't be sure if these were all the recent launch or were older satellites that are within the detection sensitivity.

There is also the possibility they may have been the recent launch from Oneweb but they keep their operations pretty quite so there is little information about them. It may be their policy to blame all bright LEE satellites on Starlink ?
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