Galway Astronomy Fest Jan 2008

The place to leave details of astronomical attractions

Moderators: joe, Brian, Guy Fennimore

Post Reply
GalwayastroCLUB
Posts: 7
Joined: Fri Nov 09, 2007 1:07 am
Location: Galway City, Ireland
Contact:

Galway Astronomy Fest Jan 2008

Post by GalwayastroCLUB »

The committee of the Galway Astronomy club would just like to take this opportunity to invite anyone from the UK to the 5th Galway Astronomy Festival taking place here in the beautiful city of Galway "Tribes of Galway" from Jan 25th -26th 2008. Our city is a vibrant, bustling centre of the arts and commerce, though it still retains a relaxed and intimate atmosphere. Galway is also one of the most popular tourist destinations in Ireland. The city, with its medieval streets, waterways, extensive range of shopping facilities, wealth of music sessions and other cultural events, is a place to be treasured. The seaside town of Salthill, a Galway suburb, is a renowned summer resort. Its fine beaches open directly onto spectacular Galway Bay.

The event which co-insides with the 10th anniversary of the formation of the club is open to the public and will start with a free talk at 7.30pm on Friday January 25th at either the Westwood Hotel or a lecture hall at NUI Galway. The event restarts on Saturday January 26th at the 4* Westwood House Hotel just outside Galway City with registration from 9am-10am and first speaker on stage at 10.30am.. This year the event is primarily aimed at the cutting edge of space science with talks by leading astronomers from NUI Galway and the Open University UK. Over the two days there will be seven speakers, Trade Stands, Exhibitions, a Multi Prize Raffle, Telescope Building Workshop, a special Banquet and a tour of the "state of the art" NUI Galway Observatory.


Speakers & Talks

Dr Simon Green, a Senior Lecturer in the Planetary and Space Sciences Research Institute of the Open University, UK will open the proceedings. His talk "Stardust: A new view of Comets?",(debuted at Leeds Astromeet in 2006) will focus on the first NASA space mission dedicated solely to the exploration of a comet, and the first robotic mission designed to return extraterrestrial material from outside the orbit of the Moon. The sample return pod was returned to Earth in January last year and analysis of such fascinating celestial specks is expected to yield important insights into the evolution of the Sun its planets and possibly even the origin of life.

Dr Matt Redman on the story of the once 9th Planet, now demoted to a Dwarf planet in a talk entitled "Is Pluto a Planet, why was it downgraded to a dwarf". In August 2006 the International Astronomical Union voted to demote the 9th solar system planet Pluto, discovered in 1930, to the new status of "Dwarf Planet". This followed a decade in which approaching 200 non-solar planets (Exo-planets) have been discovered around other stars, including pulsars, growing numbers of Pluto-like 'Kuiper Belt' objects, isolated 'planets' with no star, and 'Brown Dwarfs' not quite planet or star. The media had a field day over Pluto's demotion, mixing some total nonsense with some shrewd challenges to the decision, which is still controversial among professionals. In talk he will summarise the issues around Pluto's demotion, discuss current and the potential for further re-classifications in the future. Matt Redmann is a Lecturer at the Dept of Experimental Physics at NUI Galway where he has worked since 2003. Currently his teaching responsibilities include Star & Planet Formation, Molecular Astrophysics, Astro-chemistry and Supernova remnants and has over 60 science papers to his credit.


Dr Nicholas Devaney will look at the latest pioneering work in the search for so called Extra-Solar Planets that orbit around other stars and the search for another Earth. From 1995- 2005 he worked as Adaptive Optics manager in La Palma during construction of the Gran Telescopio Canaries (GTC) a 10.4 metre telescope with 36 mirror segments, today most powerful of its kind on the planet. Other projects he is involved with have been co-ordinating research on co phasing mirror segments for the new European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT), while he also helped with the design studies group on its 42 metre mirror

Dr Mark Lang a lecturer with the Gamma Ray research group at NUI Galway will probe the VERITAS (Very Energetic Radiation Imaging Telescope Array System) project that will examine the heavens in the TeV (that's very-high-energy gamma rays) range from its observatory at Mount Whipple, Arizona. TeV sources include supernova remnants and
active galactic nuclei, powerful gamma ray bursts, and evidence of mysterious Dark Matter particles. With its array of four 12m telescopes, VERITAS hopes to be able to provide vital clues to how these exotic objects produce radiation at such extreme energies.

The NUI Galway Observatory will be open to the attendees by Professor Mike Redfern. The observatory consists of a ‘state of the art' Semi-automated 16 inch Cassegrain with high quality instrumentation. There is also a 3 meter radio telescope on the observatory grounds.

Michael O’Connell Originally from Kerry but now a resident of Monasterevin, Co. Kildare, Michael is the current Chairperson of Tullamore Astronomical Society (TAS). He has recently completed the construction of a backyard observatory and telescope. This talk focuses on Michael's efforts, as someone not proficient in DIY, on overcoming the challenges involved, to building a large backyard telescope.



Ronan Newman is from Claremorris Co Mayo and is currently secretary of the Galway Astronomy Club. His main interests are Binocular Astronomy, Space missions and technology. His talk will examine robotic exploration of the Outer Solar System especially focusing on the NASA Galileo mission to Jupiter in the mid 1990’s.

On Saturday evening there will be a special 10th anniversary dinner followed by a talk by John Flannery who hails from Dromineer in Co. Tipperary. His main interests in astronomy are sky folklore, all aspects of astronomy with the unaided eye, and the more unusual nooks and crannies of astronomical history. He is currently Chairperson of the South Dublin Astronomical Society will again entertain us with at talk centred around his recent tour of Observatories and Star Parties in the USA during the summer of 2007.

Later that night and weather permitting there will be an observing session with some of Irelands Largest amateur telescopes on display at a secluded and private dark sky site 12 miles north of the city


As you can see a very packed event and we hope you to see you at the Festival in January, you can find further information at www.galwayastronomyclub.ie or phone the secretary on 0868434003.

We recommend you use www.gohop.com for finding connections to Galway from your location of departure.

Galway Airport is 6 km from Galway city centre. The airport is serviced by flights from:

Dublin
Cork
London
Luton
Manchester
Edinburgh
Leeds Bradford
Cardiff
Lorient
Bristol
Newcastle
Belfast

All services to Galway Airport are provided by Aer Arann and Flybe further details on flight times etc can be found on Aer Arann, Flybe and Galway Airport website.

Ronan Newman
Secretary
Galway Astronomy
Western Ireland
Sarah
Posts: 3
Joined: Sat Jul 23, 2011 4:16 am
Contact:

Post by Sarah »

I must say that it has been three years since that event took place. As far as I can say, the event really was really great especially having been conducted in Galway. I am eagerly hoping to see a new remarketing discussion being put-up regarding space explorations in next year’s meeting.
PeteGunterman
Posts: 1
Joined: Mon Feb 06, 2012 2:25 pm
Contact:

Re: Galway Astronomy Fest Jan 2008

Post by PeteGunterman »

I had the opportunity to attend this particular festival, and I just want to say that the people and experience was truly memorable. I realize that it's a few years back, but I would like to thank all the good people in the club who made this festival a wonderful and memorable event.

Cheers, Pete.


GalwayastroCLUB wrote:The committee of the Galway Astronomy club would just like to take this opportunity to invite anyone from the UK to the 5th Galway Astronomy Festival taking place here in the beautiful city of Galway "Tribes of Galway" from Jan 25th -26th 2008. Our city is a vibrant, bustling centre of the arts and commerce, though it still retains a relaxed and intimate atmosphere. Galway is also one of the most popular tourist destinations in Ireland. The city, with its medieval streets, waterways, extensive range of shopping facilities, wealth of music sessions and other cultural events, is a place to be treasured. The seaside town of Salthill, a Galway suburb, is a renowned summer resort. Its fine beaches open directly onto spectacular Galway Bay.

The event which co-insides with the 10th anniversary of the formation of the club is open to the public and will start with a free talk at 7.30pm on Friday January 25th at either the Westwood Hotel or a lecture hall at NUI Galway. The event restarts on Saturday January 26th at the 4* Westwood House Hotel just outside Galway City with registration from 9am-10am and first speaker on stage at 10.30am.. This year the event is primarily aimed at the cutting edge of space science with talks by leading astronomers from NUI Galway and the Open University UK. Over the two days there will be seven speakers, Trade Stands, Exhibitions, a Multi Prize Raffle, Telescope Building Workshop, a special Banquet and a tour of the "state of the art" NUI Galway Observatory.


Speakers & Talks

Dr Simon Green, a Senior Lecturer in the Planetary and Space Sciences Research Institute of the Open University, UK will open the proceedings. His talk "Stardust: A new view of Comets?",(debuted at Leeds Astromeet in 2006) will focus on the first NASA space mission dedicated solely to the exploration of a comet, and the first robotic mission designed to return extraterrestrial material from outside the orbit of the Moon. The sample return pod was returned to Earth in January last year and analysis of such fascinating celestial specks is expected to yield important insights into the evolution of the Sun its planets and possibly even the origin of life.

Dr Matt Redman on the story of the once 9th Planet, now demoted to a Dwarf planet in a talk entitled "Is Pluto a Planet, why was it downgraded to a dwarf". In August 2006 the International Astronomical Union voted to demote the 9th solar system planet Pluto, discovered in 1930, to the new status of "Dwarf Planet". This followed a decade in which approaching 200 non-solar planets (Exo-planets) have been discovered around other stars, including pulsars, growing numbers of Pluto-like 'Kuiper Belt' objects, isolated 'planets' with no star, and 'Brown Dwarfs' not quite planet or star. The media had a field day over Pluto's demotion, mixing some total nonsense with some shrewd challenges to the decision, which is still controversial among professionals. In talk he will summarise the issues around Pluto's demotion, discuss current and the potential for further re-classifications in the future. Matt Redmann is a Lecturer at the Dept of Experimental Physics at NUI Galway where he has worked since 2003. Currently his teaching responsibilities include Star & Planet Formation, Molecular Astrophysics, Astro-chemistry and Supernova remnants and has over 60 science papers to his credit.


Dr Nicholas Devaney will look at the latest pioneering work in the search for so called Extra-Solar Planets that orbit around other stars and the search for another Earth. From 1995- 2005 he worked as Adaptive Optics manager in La Palma during construction of the Gran Telescopio Canaries (GTC) a 10.4 metre telescope with 36 mirror segments, today most powerful of its kind on the planet. Other projects he is involved with have been co-ordinating research on co phasing mirror segments for the new European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT), while he also helped with the design studies group on its 42 metre mirror

Dr Mark Lang a lecturer with the Gamma Ray research group at NUI Galway will probe the VERITAS (Very Energetic Radiation Imaging Telescope Array System) project that will examine the heavens in the TeV (that's very-high-energy gamma rays) range from its observatory at Mount Whipple, Arizona. TeV sources include supernova remnants and
active galactic nuclei, powerful gamma ray bursts, and evidence of mysterious Dark Matter particles. With its array of four 12m telescopes, VERITAS hopes to be able to provide vital clues to how these exotic objects produce radiation at such extreme energies.

The NUI Galway Observatory will be open to the attendees by Professor Mike Redfern. The observatory consists of a ‘state of the art' Semi-automated 16 inch Cassegrain with high quality instrumentation. There is also a 3 meter radio telescope on the observatory grounds.

Michael O’Connell Originally from Kerry but now a resident of Monasterevin, Co. Kildare, Michael is the current Chairperson of Tullamore Astronomical Society (TAS). He has recently completed the construction of a backyard observatory and telescope. This talk focuses on Michael's efforts, as someone not proficient in DIY, on overcoming the challenges involved, to building a large backyard telescope.



Ronan Newman is from Claremorris Co Mayo and is currently secretary of the Galway Astronomy Club. His main interests are Binocular Astronomy, Space missions and technology. His talk will examine robotic exploration of the Outer Solar System especially focusing on the NASA Galileo mission to Jupiter in the mid 1990’s.

On Saturday evening there will be a special 10th anniversary dinner followed by a talk by John Flannery who hails from Dromineer in Co. Tipperary. His main interests in astronomy are sky folklore, all aspects of astronomy with the unaided eye, and the more unusual nooks and crannies of astronomical history. He is currently Chairperson of the South Dublin Astronomical Society will again entertain us with at talk centred around his recent tour of Observatories and Star Parties in the USA during the summer of 2007.

Later that night and weather permitting there will be an observing session with some of Irelands Largest amateur telescopes on display at a secluded and private dark sky site 12 miles north of the city


As you can see a very packed event and we hope you to see you at the Festival in January, you can find further information at www.galwayastronomyclub.ie or phone the secretary on 0868434003.

We recommend you use www.gohop.com for finding connections to Galway from your location of departure.

Galway Airport is 6 km from Galway city centre. The airport is serviced by flights from:

Dublin
Cork
London
Luton
Manchester
Edinburgh
Leeds Bradford
Cardiff
Lorient
Bristol
Newcastle
Belfast

All services to Galway Airport are provided by Aer Arann and Flybe further details on flight times etc can be found on Aer Arann, Flybe and Galway Airport website.

Ronan Newman
Secretary
Galway Astronomy
Western Ireland
jamesalbert
Posts: 1
Joined: Fri Mar 09, 2012 1:51 pm
Contact:

Post by jamesalbert »

Even i attended this festival. Had a great and wonderful experience as @PeteGunterman said
Post Reply