Art and Astronomy, Daresbury Laboratory 29 April 2011 7pm

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david entwistle
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Art and Astronomy, Daresbury Laboratory 29 April 2011 7pm

Post by david entwistle »

See here for details. Also to be web cast.

Talking Science at Daresbury Laboratory
Art and Astronomy
Barry J. Kellett
Daresbury Laboratory

Friday 29 April 2011
7pm
Audience: 12+

Astronomical objects often appear in paintings or other historical accounts. Such works of art can then be used, by astronomers, to gain a deeper insight into the artists' mind or location.

This talk will discuss two paintings by van Gogh and two more by Norwegian artist Edvard Munch - including his famous painting, "The Scream".

Astronomy can place van Gogh on an exact spot ~120 years ago to within about 1 minute!

Astronomers can also date the exact moment that the Roman's invaded Britain and also tell you which "special" star Shakespeare used in his opening lines of Hamlet.
David Entwistle
xwindross
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Post by xwindross »

We had Barry at our club meeting for this talk in September. I found it very interesting and it left me wondering about other art on which the same techniques could be applied.

I would definitely recommend this talk.
david entwistle
Posts: 663
Joined: Sun Aug 13, 2006 12:29 pm
Location: Goosnargh, north of Preston, UK
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Post by david entwistle »

xwindross wrote:We had Barry at our club meeting for this talk in September. I found it very interesting and it left me wondering about other art on which the same techniques could be applied.

I would definitely recommend this talk.
Hi,

There's an interesting case discussed here, on the SPA forum, regarding Walt Whitman's poem "Year of Meteors (1859-60)", investigated by the SPA's own Alastair McBeath, along with George Drobnock and Andrei Gheorghe and independently by Texas State University's Don Olson. Don Olson's web site includes several other interesting investigations of what may be termed forensic astronomy. It's an interesting subject, which I'll keep it in mind next time I'm visiting an art gallery.
David Entwistle
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