TAL's new 8-inch refractor ..

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brian livesey
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TAL's new 8-inch refractor ..

Post by brian livesey »

How would you like one of these in the backgarden? http://stargazerslounge.com/discussions ... -pics.html
Last edited by brian livesey on Mon Nov 28, 2011 9:50 am, edited 2 times in total.
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Post by brian livesey »

Sorry Folks, but I can't get the item to highlight.
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nightbadger
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Post by nightbadger »

its a thing of beauty, just a shame we dont get much tal gear here in the uk
TAL100RS, startravel 150 skymax 180 pro
David Frydman
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Post by David Frydman »

OVL list some TAL refractors, including unusual ones.

Regards, David
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Post by nightbadger »

David Frydman wrote:OVL list some TAL refractors, including unusual ones.

Regards, David
They list the 100RS and the 125 apo multi element scope
TAL100RS, startravel 150 skymax 180 pro
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Post by David Frydman »

The 125 Apo is quite expensive but probably good.

There are quite a lot of old university refractors of 8 to 12 inches. I used the, I think, 9.5 inch f/12 at Harvard for a short time in 1988.
The 8inch f/9 Tal probably has less false colour with special glasses, which I hope are well protected by coatings and sealing against moisture.

regards,David
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Post by adrian lord »

Lovely, but I don't think my back is up to it anymore.

Lovely, but I also don't think my bank balance is up to it anymore.
TMB/APM 152 apochromatic Refractor is my weapon of choice!
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Post by David Frydman »

I think Astrophysics made similar items maybe even better triplets.
Starfires?
Not sure if they are still made.
At least they had a 7 inch and maybe larger.

David
adrian lord
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Post by adrian lord »

David Frydman wrote:I think Astrophysics made similar items maybe even better triplets.
Starfires?
Not sure if they are still made.
At least they had a 7 inch and maybe larger.

David
I have been on the waiting list for an Astrophysics Starfire in the six inch class since 2006.

I recently contacted them to buy a star diagonal and to update my address detail for notification. I was told there are no plans in the medium term future to do a production run.

APM/TMB do large triplet refractors at sensible lead times, hence I bought the 152 as a stopgap.....(!)

Astrophysics used to advertise in the US astronomy magazines and the adverts gave the impression that there were scopes available to buy off the shelf which was never true. After making a mild criticism about these ads on a cloudynights thread I was expelled from CN forum! To criticise AP in the States is tantamount to heresy and high treason combined. They have a legendary status and cult-like following which the lack of availability and waiting lists only serve to enhance.

APM/TMB used to list refractors upto 18" made to order IIRC.

After 8" they tended to be doublet achromatic design I think whereas 8" and below are triplet apos.
TMB/APM 152 apochromatic Refractor is my weapon of choice!
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Post by David Frydman »

Dear Adrian,
I think one of the local Finnish societies had a 7 inch Starfire in addition to perhaps a 12 or 16 inch SCT in one or two domes. I think the delivery was quite speedy then.
I think there was an 8inch Starfire.
You should not have been expelled if your only 'crime' was to criticise delivery times.
There are bird magazines in this country where it is clear they do not criticise binoculars because of the advertising revenue. This is wrong.
The test binoculars should be bought secretly through normal channels and the chances are that the ones received will be far worse than the tested samples.
Perhaps the forum also had other reasons, but honest criticism of a product is not a reason to be expelled.

So when are you getting your 18 inch refractor?
I think a cherry picker will make a good observing platform, and you can also use it to prune any obstructing trees.
Perhaps a large windbreak as well.

The largest refractor I have used regularly is a 135mm O.G. long focus Merz, which was good, although Horace Dall had to refigure something like an 8 inch Merz and said the quality of that was not good and I think he did not rate Merz highly.
I have a very poor quality Wildey about 130mm f/8 and also an excellent David Hinds O.G. 120mm f/8.3, which easily takes 250x.
I briefly used the Harvard 9.5 inch f/12, but only at fairly low power. I think that is a very capable scope.

Regards, David
adrian lord
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Post by adrian lord »

Hi David,

Sorry for brief reply - I am at work!

Interested to hear about your Wildey being poor - mine is also rather poor to ay the least when compared to the Tak and TMB, and, worst of all there is ghosting of bright objects (moon, jupiter etc.). I wonder about the collimation - maybe I should have a fiddle but I wouldn't really know what I was doing.

Also the Wildey has a draw tube focuser which is not easy after the luxury of Feathertouch!

kindest

Adrian
TMB/APM 152 apochromatic Refractor is my weapon of choice!
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Post by David Frydman »

The collimation is easy to see if you look at a bright star or Jupiter.
If in focus or out there is a smearing to one side of the image then it is out of collimation enough to be degrading.
But make sure it is not in your eyes by rotating the scope.

My Wildey scope is really poor. Several zones of different curvature, and as you say bad ghosting.
Any OVL refractor is probably better. In fact these refractors are remarkable value, while generally being at least good.


There has been a folded 8 inch refractor changing hands for decades.
Perhaps you could buy that fairly cheaply.

Perhaps your new 18 inch refractor could be a folded refractor.

There was a 12inch long focus refractor mounted on a small truck that toured New York. For a small fee you could look at say the people at the top of the Empire State building. I think it used to be a nice little earner.
Perhaps a type of Del Boy enterprise.

Regards, David
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Post by brian livesey »

I have a Wildey 4-inch/f.12 objective that had incomplete polishing. Wildey was going blind by then and should have given up glass-grinding. I had the polishing, and possibly other corrections, done by Jim Hysom at AE.
You mentioned, David, the Harvard 9.5-inch refractor. Is it a Clarke? Or maybe a Fitz? According to S&T, the latter made thin objectives; too thin, some say.
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Post by David Frydman »

Dear Brian,

I did not know but the internet suggests it is a 9 inch Alvan Clark refractor made in 1912 and recently refurbished. When?

It says the public use it and get much better views than with the much earlier great 15 inch Harvard refractor made by Merz and someone else around 1850 ? Equal largest scope in the world then.

I think the one I used is 9.5inch, and probably the Clark.
I asked Stephen O'Meara if it was f/12. He said yes and told the group of about 30 what I had said and I was correct and he explained to the public viewers what it meant.

I think he made early observations of Uranus markings with it, which were not accepted at the time, but spacecraft showed he was correct.

Unfortunately I was not able to use it at high power on Jupiter as a low power had been selected for the general public and there were many lined up to get a look.

I can't remember if I looked through the giant Greenwich refractor, so I don't know what the largest scope I have looked through.

The largest scope I have used extensively is my 317mm Dall Kirkham.

Regards, David
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Post by David Frydman »

Sorry, I forgot.
I used a 14.5 inch f/5 Newtonian and 20.5 inch f/4 Dobsonian a lot.
Both of these showed quite a lot of green colour in M42 in light pollution.
But they were not really planetary scopes although both had good optics.
I also made early observations of Halley's comet with the 14.5inch. And I confirmed its movement.

Cloudy today.

Regards, David
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