Carl Zeiss Jena 10x50W Jenoptem binoculars.

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brian livesey
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Post by brian livesey »

I sold the German 7X50 glasses at a low price to a schoolteacher years ago. I remember his hands were shaking when he held them, he was taken aback by them. :lol:
brian
David Frydman
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Post by David Frydman »

No wonder.

I got mine for a fiver at a camera fair. I was blown awayon looking through them. Mine are Leitz with coded letters. Unfortunately the balsam is bad in one O.G. and it is not worth doing anything to them. The eyecups alone go for £40. The seller had them in a junk box.

David

The coded manufacturers letters are hidden under the eyecups.
mike a feist
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Post by mike a feist »

David Frydman wrote:Dear Mike,
I cannot at the moment recall the name Scope, although it has a familiar ring. If it says fully coated optics I would guess 1950s, 1960s. What colour are the coatings. Light blue, dark blue. Have the coatings on the eyepieces come off? Are some surfaces uncoated internally,i.e. white?
Is the O.G. fully 40mm clear aperture? Is it 8.5x, compare it with a well known 8x30 or 8x40. Or measure it. Do the binoculars have a Japanese optical institute yellow sticker with numbers and figures? Is there an oval sticky patch where this might have been. Is the hidden figure a partial Jplus japanese mark? Does it say Made in Occupied Japan.
Additional info;;;
The leather case actually says "Made in England" and is of traditional design. In the lid of this are a number of hand-written addresses which would suggest that 1960 could be too late and might suggest that the 1940-1950s might be right.
The OG looks ok at 40mm but when I tried to measure the EP I was aware that the "disc" was "squared-off", so not quite as good as I thought!
Reflections off the OG of a window are brownish for the largest inverted one and bluish for the smaller erect one.
A more careful look in daylight also shows that the numbers can be read and are J-B241 (for the right side) and J-E15 (for the left) -l and r refering to to sides as you look through them and not as you read them and the J s are sloping.
regards mike[/i]
David Frydman
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Post by David Frydman »

The English leather case is common. It might be that only lower priced F.O.B. were allowed into Britain post WW2, and the good english cases allowed more to be spent on the binoculars.

The squared off prisms are common for most binoculars of this type wit I think BK 7 glass.

If 1940s it should probably have MIOJ, i.e. Made in occupied Japan and I am not sure how early coatings appeared on cheaper Japanese binoculars and in many cases early coatings rubbed off such as in Ross lenses even to mid 1950s.

So on balance I think made in 1950s.

The fact that the prisms show squared off slightly vignetted performance is not important.
Do they have good resolutiuon and are they well collimated and fairly light with no mistiness or fungus? Those are the main points.
If so use them.

They are clearly Japanese from your descriptions.

Regards, David
brian livesey
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Post by brian livesey »

What became of British KERSHAW binoculars? Someone I knew told me he'd had a pair, but that he'd lost them on the moors. They were of brass construction.
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David Frydman
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Post by David Frydman »

They were a major British manufacturer of binoculars, long gone as with most of British makers. I thin also associated with cameras I will check.
Also Wray and others.
Lack of technical schools, apprenticeships, foreign competition.
Frankly we just gave up and expected an easy life.
And British Leyland ; Don't ask. Well bad management, militant unions etc. etc.
It wasn't me driving but the Maxi engine fell out.
My Austin 1800, a fabulous car, but when you went round corners the oil to the sideways engine all went to o ne end causing piston failure. The Finns did a good job repairing it under warranty. It had the number ROV which intrigued them as Rovaniemi is the capital of finnish Lapland.

We had good ideas but bad follow up.
At the same time I was driven at 100mph in a BMW in 40 degrees C hundreds of miles. No common British car could do that. The BMW was superb.

David
mike a feist
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Post by mike a feist »

Thank you David for your info....they are indeed probaby as clear/clean inside as the day that they were bought and have not been knocked out of alignment. For the last two decades they have been in a nice dry room and only used on a couple of occasions when at the house and had nothing of mine to hand -I saw Comet Austin with them in Aprill/May 1990 for example.
Re the KERSHAW make of binoculars.........I was given such a binocular by a relative. It was quite small but very solidly built and markd as WD
use but was very mucky inside bit was unable to do anything about this and finally attempted but failed to disassemble, they were so solid (1
I was hoping to make a monocular out of them). In Kensington Gardens (Brighton) Snoopers Paradise, there is a larger military binocular apparently in A1 mint condition (according to the label) and has all the extra bits. I have not asked to examine it because it is priced at just under £400!!!!! Once you ask to see something - unless it turns out to be "a dud" ..............maf
Lady Isabella
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Post by Lady Isabella »

quote]
A more careful look in daylight also shows that the numbers can be read and are J-B241 (for the right side) and J-E15 (for the left) -l and r refering to to sides as you look through them and not as you read them and the J s are sloping.
regards mike[/i][/quote]

Mike - Your binoculars were made by the Japanese company Kazuo Tsuchihashi (JB241).
The metalwork frames were made by a different Japanese company, but at the moment I cannot find the name for the company with the metalwork code JE15.
The company Tokyo Oputikaru Co. Ltd.- Tokyo Optical Co. Ltd. have the manufacturers code JB15, they might have made the metalwork frames?.
The letters JE15 indicate the name of the company making the metalwork, while JB241 gives the name of the company making the finished product.

Your binoculars were made after the year 1960.
David Frydman
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Post by David Frydman »

Lady Isabella,
Wonderful work.
I suspected they might be later because of the colours and quality of the coatings.
But Mike seemed to favour an earlier date, so I compromised with the 1950s.

I have no personal knowledge of the manufacturer.

Regards, David.
Lady Isabella
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Post by Lady Isabella »

Regarding Russian Tento binoculars, Tento was an export department, their name appeared on lots
of things exported to the west. The majority of the Tento binoculars were manufactured by ZOMZ .
Another factory Komz, also supplied binoculars, nowadays Komz sign their binoculars with the name
"Baigish"

I have both 7x50 and 20x60 Soviet Union binoculars made by Zomz, and optically they are superb.
David Frydman
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Post by David Frydman »

The smaller Baigish binoculars such as 8x30, 12x45, 10x40 are still good or at least some examples are good or very good. Some with reticles some without.

However in the last 15 years or so I haven't met any Russian or is it Kazan? 20x60s that are even remotrely as good as selected Soviet era 20x60s.

The 7x30 and 10x42? with seven or so element eyepieces are amazing as there is nil distortion although they are wierd on panning.

Some of the miniature binoculars are very disappointing with only the central 30% being any good with a very heavily curved field.

The 30x50 mirror binoculars I think from a different factory are very good but heavy.

Regards David.
Lady Isabella
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Post by Lady Isabella »

The 20x60 Russian Kronos binoculars are still being made by ZOMZ ( Zagorsk Optical-Mechanical Factory),
I don't think that I seen any made by Komz (Kazan Optical-mechanical Factory).
Looking at my old Soviet Union manual and the new Kronos manual, the binoculars are exactly the same in specification. Looking at pictures of the Kronos there are only a couple of very minor cosmetic detail different between the two i.e. different focus wheel and eye-cup on one of the oculars.

Having said that, I think I would rather still buy one of the older Soviet Union made pairs.
David Frydman
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Post by David Frydman »

I think you are correct about which factory makes the 20x60ss.
Kronos also make or madethe very wide angle binoculars 6x30?, 7x35, 8x40, 10x50 if I rember correctly. In very garish camoflage. They are O.K. but mechanically sloppy.

The problem is that as soon as the Soviet empire collapsed the OPTICAL quality plumetted.
There is no comparison between old and new. And even the later Soviet ones are not as good as the slightly earlier selected ones, which are superb compared to anything.
I probably bought three or so of the Russian ones and did not find one of very good optical quality. They work and give good views but they do not resolve well.
I just regret not buying several of the top quality original selected ones when I had the chance. The one I have easily showed Jupiter's belts, although after years of daily use the are now out of collimation.
David
David Frydman
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Post by David Frydman »

I have always been a fan of Soviet and Russsian or satellite countries optics.
But some items are bizarre. The Fotons are very nice binoculars but in some cases they have a pungent smell that lasts from decades either from the treatment of the leather or from the leather cases.
There are definitely Russian binocular cases and also Chinese where the smell is appalling for decades.
And the later Baigish cases I think imitation leather that are simply too tight to fit the binoculars. You will likely damage these almost indestructable binoculars by using the cases. The 8x30 clearly survive cars being driven over them but not their cases.
and what other country would produce the very nice 30x50s that uses mirrors instead of prisms and resolve wonderfully. Also their folded optic Yukon 50, 60 and 100 spotting scopes againg using mirrors.
And I think the Kiev Avtomat camera that not only has a large sector shutter but a bizarre mechanical auto exposure system. I don't think many of these last long.
Mind you we British made the Purma which has different speeds depending which wa up you hold it, I think using a weight to control shutter speed.
And the American Mercury uses a sector shutter.

But getting back to the Russians, they are not afraid to experiment with unusual designs.
Their binoculars and cameras also work at minus 40 degrees, mainly because the tolerances are so wide.
I have had great fun with them and numerous Brits have had the very basic heavy Zenith as their first camera.
I even used a Lubitel medium format camera which leaked light and which TOE cured for me in their never dull service department.
The main problem with dealing with their factories is that things are decided in never ending committeees so that if you point out flaws or want chenges no single person can instantly fix it. It often is impossible to get these necessary changes made.
At least the Japanese rapidly became world leaders in cameras and other optics by listening to all criticism and advice and instantly improving their products.
All good fun for someone with a love of optical devices.

David.
mike a feist
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Post by mike a feist »

Lady Isabella wrote:quote
Mike - Your binoculars were made by the Japanese company Kazuo Tsuchihashi (JB241).
The metalwork frames were made by a different Japanese company, but at the moment I cannot find the name for the company with the metalwork code JE15.
The company Tokyo Oputikaru Co. Ltd.- Tokyo Optical Co. Ltd. have the manufacturers code JB15, they might have made the metalwork frames?.
The letters JE15 indicate the name of the company making the metalwork, while JB241 gives the name of the company making the finished product.
Your binoculars were made after the year 1960.
Absolutely excellent reply - I was misled no doubt on the date from the partly erased address and insufficient information.......I will look again and attempt to check my family facts.
Thank you. mike
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