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 Post subject: Kepler 452b after Mars!
PostPosted: Wed Apr 03, 2019 8:30 am 
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According to New Scientist 30th March, we have found more than 4000 exoplanets.
One of the explanations for life on Earth is Ultra Violet from the Sun. Last year researchers introduced a so-called "abiogenesis zone".
Justino-Malando & Mendez (Puerto Rico University) checked out the supposed 49 of all the exoplanets in the so-called habitable zones but only 8 matched their new criteria. However, Malando suggests only ONE of them, Kepler 452b is suitable, as planets bigger than 1.7x Earth's radius are too gassy !
Kepler 452b is only 1.63x Earth's size !!! and a convenient 1400 light years away.
In our Solar System only Earth & Mars lie in both the habitable & abiogenesis zones.
So after Mars it's next stop Kepler 452b.
from Cliff


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 03, 2019 9:35 am 
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I've read the N.S. article Cliff. It doesn't mention the Earth-like planet that's supposed to be orbiting Proxima Centauri.

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PostPosted: Wed Apr 03, 2019 6:35 pm 
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Brian
Thanks for your reply.
That's interesting. I wonder if that planet fits all the criteria ?
Best wishes from Cliff


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 04, 2019 2:03 pm 
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Proxima is a red dwarf that produces powerful solar winds, so it could be difficult for life to take a hold on the planet, assuming that all other things are equal.

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PostPosted: Thu Apr 04, 2019 7:52 pm 
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Brian
To be fair, the New Scientist mag article only provides limited gen. However, it does say Malando & Mendez checked out the supposed 49 (out of 4,000+) planets, of which only EIGHT matched their additionally required criteria. So I assume your Proxima Centauri planet doesn't achieve those requirements.
Funnily enough the latest NS mag which I've only as yet glanced through seems to say that any water there might be on Mars may not be fit for human consumption ?
Best wishes from Cliff


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 05, 2019 12:28 pm 
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Let's face it Cliff, the whole of Mars isn't fit for human consumption. I'll stay where I am :wink: .

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PostPosted: Mon Apr 08, 2019 6:44 pm 
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BrianL
Dare I say it - I think I agree with you.
In fact I'm inclined to think, apart from possibly prestige - there may not be any point in humans actually visiting Mars for a while to come yet. But I might be just getting a bit ancient now. There are simply too many big problems that need sorting out here on Earth.
Best of luck from Cliff


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