Canon 1000D

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PaulB
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Canon 1000D

Post by PaulB »

I'm about to join the world of DSLR astro-imaging.

I have brought myself a very good, used, 1000D, which is mint.

I also have on order a Baader MPCC for my Orion Optics 200-800 F4 imaging Newtonian and.

An Astronomic EOS photo, CLS filter.

The camera is un-modded. But I am having it modded during the next couple off weeks.

I am very familiar with CCD imaging . And I will still use my Atik 16ic. But.

My main imaging camera from now on, will be the 1000D.

I am looking forward very much, to shooting, nebulae through my WM Optics 66SD in colour.

And imaging Spring galaxies in colour through the 8" F4.
Paul Anthony Brierley
Observation Co-ordinator for.
Macclesfield Astronomical Society
https://www.flickr.com/photos/paulabrierley/
http://pabastronomy.blogspot.co.uk/2018/
Ender Of Days
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Post by Ender Of Days »

What exactly is the difference between modded and unmodded on the Image ?
I understand what gets done to the camera but not "why" .

Id love the same camera so am interested in doing the same if its worth having it done,

Thanks,

JJ..
aint no speed limit where im comin from ..
lets hit the highway doing 69


ETX 125
Meade Series 4000 box set
David Frydman
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Post by David Frydman »

I am not an imager, but it may be that the infra red blocking filter is removed so allowing a wider range of the spectrum to be recorded.
I think some deep sky objects are brighter in the infra red so adding this part to the image shows more.

If this is the case it may be some lenses will show halos around stars if the focus is different for red, infra red and say green.
But I suppose a Newtonian is free from these problems.

Someone who knows will add more and correct me if I have it wrong.

Regards, David
PaulB
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Post by PaulB »

David Frydman wrote:I am not an imager, but it may be that the infra-red blocking filter is removed so allowing a wider range of the spectrum to be recorded.
I think some deep sky objects are brighter in the infra-red so adding this part to the image shows more.

If this is the case it may be some lenses will show halos around stars if the focus is different for red, infra-red and say green.
But I suppose a Newtonian is free from these problems.

Someone who knows will add more and correct me if I have it wrong.

Regards, David

You have more or less answered the question, David.

The 1000D. Is one of the best cameras, following on from the Canon 350D.

With the IR filter in place, you are able to image the night sky with very good camera sensitivity. If you Google, Canon 1000D astro-imaging. You will be suprised to see. How good the camera is, for recording nebulae and galaxies in full colour.

The camera can still be used for day time photography.

With the filter removed. The camera, as David has said. Allows a wider range of the spectrum to be recorded.

I think in effect, it turns the camera into a CCD camera. But with out the cooling of a dedicated CCD.

You can get the filter replaced with a Baader filter, for every day use.

I bought my camera because.

I am on a tight budget, and couldn't justify the £1500 pound asking price. For a CCD camera with a sensor, of similar size to the Canon. Together with a USB filter wheel, and RGB filters.

I didn't fancy taking RGB images because of the time envolved.

The 1000D ticked all the boxes for me :D

I can not answer the question about star halos, perhaps there is somebody else who can.
Paul Anthony Brierley
Observation Co-ordinator for.
Macclesfield Astronomical Society
https://www.flickr.com/photos/paulabrierley/
http://pabastronomy.blogspot.co.uk/2018/
David Frydman
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Post by David Frydman »

Dear Paul,
I think with a genuine APO photographic lens the halos will be smaller than with say the standard zoom.
The APOs should be corrected for three colours but not necessarily for infra red.
So I would expect certain lenses to do much better than others.
Besides a Newtonian I expect a Maksutov Cassegrain to be pretty good as they normally are colour free although I don't know if extending into the infra red might induce some false colour.

Regards, David
PaulB
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Post by PaulB »

Thank you David.
Paul Anthony Brierley
Observation Co-ordinator for.
Macclesfield Astronomical Society
https://www.flickr.com/photos/paulabrierley/
http://pabastronomy.blogspot.co.uk/2018/
Cliff
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Post by Cliff »

Dear Paul
I think the Canon 300D - SLR is an excellent digital camera. Indeed my Son has one, although he doesn't use it for astronomy.
However, just to mention that I think the Canon sensor is CMOS not strictly a CCD.
Best wishes from Cliff
PaulB
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Post by PaulB »

Cliff wrote:Dear Paul
I think the Canon 300D - SLR is an excellent digital camera. Indeed my Son has one, although he doesn't use it for astronomy.
However, just to mention that I think the Canon sensor is CMOS not strictly a CCD.
Best wishes from Cliff
Dear Cliff.

You are correct.
Paul Anthony Brierley
Observation Co-ordinator for.
Macclesfield Astronomical Society
https://www.flickr.com/photos/paulabrierley/
http://pabastronomy.blogspot.co.uk/2018/
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