Possible re-entry

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stella
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Possible re-entry

Post by stella »

Possible re-entry visible on Saturday May 20 at around 22:50 U.T.
After nearly 42 years in orbit, 75-72B, Cos B rocket, #8063 will
be passing north-south over U.K. So it's worthwhile spending a
few minutes at about that time in case it's in the process of decaying.

joe
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Re: Possible re-entry

Post by joe »

Were there any reports on this or was there nothing to see in the end?
200mm Newtonian, OMC140, ETX90, 15x70 Binoculars.

stella
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Re: Possible re-entry

Post by stella »

Due to an increase in atmospheric density, caused by heating by solar radiation,
this object decayed around 5 hours earlier than predicted.
Therefore well away from the U.K. Have not seen any reports from elsewhere
in the world.

joe
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Re: Possible re-entry

Post by joe »

Ok, thanks for the update.
200mm Newtonian, OMC140, ETX90, 15x70 Binoculars.

brian livesey
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Re: Possible re-entry

Post by brian livesey »

Was this vintage satellite of military or civilian type? The "Cos" in its designation might indicate that it was a soviet-era Cosmos military satellite. If so, there might have been a uranium power source onboard, similar to the Cosmos satellite that disintegrated over Canada years ago.
brian

stella
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Re: Possible re-entry

Post by stella »

No, the "Cos" refers to Cosmic ray studies.
COS-B was the first European Space Research Organisation mission to study cosmic gamma ray sources. COS-B was first put forward by the European scientific community in the mid-1960s and approved by the ESRO council in 1969.
The satellite succumbed to lunar gravitation effects back in the 1980s, but
the Delta 1 rocket (American) had now reached the end of its lifetime.
The rocket's polar orbit proved useful in determining the strength of
winds in the upper atmosphere at heights around 300 kilometres.
Incidentally, although 75-72B was not seen at the time of its decay,
there were several videos of the decay of 17-21B, the rocket of the
Chinese supply spacecraft which docked with the Tiangong space station.
For example:
https://youtu.be/TZgzKjux29Y

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