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Don't be shy! If you're just starting out, here's the place to ask that first question

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David Frydman
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Post by David Frydman »

Are your glasses for correcting long sight or short sight or do you also have astigmatism?
If you have astigmatism is it a lot or not much
If you are correcting long or short sight, does the correction exceed 3 diopters?
Do you have prism correction for infinity use?

Do you have a local camera or binocular shop?
Camera shop staff usually know nothing about binoculars.
You could try binoculars to see if you need to wear your glasses using them.

If you need to wear glasses then you may need a binocular with long eye relief.

If you have astigmatism you may be better off with a smaller exit pupil, say by using a 12 x 50 or 10 x 40 binocular.

If you have a lazy eye a binocular may be O.K.
There may be less problem with a spotting scope.
If the Sherwood Forest optics, funny?, spotter is good then maybe that with a better tripod giving a total cost around £130 to £150 is better. Sherwoods photo owners are very knowledgeable and will give you a straight answer if you ask the quality of the Forest optics scope and a better tripod.

Do you have a local Jessops? They sometimes have special offers.

David
David Frydman
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Post by David Frydman »

Jessops have increased the price of the 8x40 Nikon action VII to £69.95.
However the 10 x 40s are £59.95. These are good but have very little eye relief so if you need to wear glasses they are not good. Also the magnification is probably nearer 11x than 10x.

Jessops have their own brand roof prism 10x42 at £39.95 at the moment.
These are of fair quality not great. I must check the eye relief on these.

Regards, David
David Frydman
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Post by David Frydman »

Tried the 10 x 42 DCF Jessops own brand waterproof roof prism binocular now at £39.95 sometimes less.
It has quite long eye relief eyepieces.
I tried it with two of my different glasses and the field without glasses is about 5.5 degrees and with glasses 4.5 degrees.
They are very lightweight and perform quite well.
With a lower price binocular like this different examples will vary.
The one I tried is good.
If you need to use glasses you may find a binocular with little or no reduction with glasses.
You have to try them in a shop.

Regards, David
bewa
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Post by bewa »

David Frydman wrote:Are your glasses for correcting long sight or short sight or do you also have astigmatism?
If you have astigmatism is it a lot or not much
If you are correcting long or short sight, does the correction exceed 3 diopters?
Do you have prism correction for infinity use?

Do you have a local camera or binocular shop?
Camera shop staff usually know nothing about binoculars.
You could try binoculars to see if you need to wear your glasses using them.

If you need to wear glasses then you may need a binocular with long eye relief.

If you have astigmatism you may be better off with a smaller exit pupil, say by using a 12 x 50 or 10 x 40 binocular.

If you have a lazy eye a binocular may be O.K.
There may be less problem with a spotting scope.
If the Sherwood Forest optics, funny?, spotter is good then maybe that with a better tripod giving a total cost around £130 to £150 is better. Sherwoods photo owners are very knowledgeable and will give you a straight answer if you ask the quality of the Forest optics scope and a better tripod.

Do you have a local Jessops? They sometimes have special offers.

David
I'm shortsighted and have an astigmatism i dont know much else about it really i suppose i should!
I've always taken my glasses off to use binoculars as i found it annoying with them on, i've never been told that i have to wear the glasses when using any bins or scopes.

There is a Jessops in Yeovil and i've found a place in Crewkerne (15mins from me) called Intrasights (http://www.intrasights.co.uk/) although they just seem to do repairs, I have just sent them an email to see if they do general sales etc
David Frydman
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Post by David Frydman »

You are lucky to have a good binocular repairer near to you.
They may have a good robust refurbished 10x50 fairly modern coated binocular for sale.
Maybe they have a Soviet/Russian 12 x45 or 12 x 40 traditional porro prism binocular. These are good if in good condition. Baigish or Tento.
Often, though, a repair to a binocular or even recollimation costs as much as a cheap new binocular.

You have choice. Jessops Yeovil, The repairer or shops in Taunton.

If you choose a binocular the Sherwoods photo 10 x 50 should be good.
If you choose a spotting scope plus good tripod there are several possibilities, even the repairer.

There is a third option. a small hand held 10 x 50 or 12 x 50 modern chinese monocular by Visionary, Baush and Lomb, Hawke and many other names.
Around £55 from memory.
There are numerous trade names, but they are all clones of each other in a badge engineering exercise gone a bit over the top.

Regards, David
bewa
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Post by bewa »

Looks like i've got a couple of options in Taunton as you say London Camera Exchange (Taunton) and SCS Astro in Wellington which is just south of Taunton.
My wife is after a DSLR and looks like we'll be heading up to Bath in a couple of weeks and there's a Jessops, London Camera Exchange and Ace Cameras.
David Frydman
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Post by David Frydman »

I have had excellent service from Ace cameras with new binoculars.
However, a used binocular was not as described, so if you buy any used item inspect it well.
A DSLR could be used on a telescope or your compact camera could be used with a spotting scope for afocal photography or digiscoping.

London camera Exchange Taunton and Bristol or Bath also do used stuff but again inspect well. Also new of course.

Regards, David
bewa
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Post by bewa »

Just had a reply from Intrasights and he says he's got some second hand binoculars with 6 month warranty so this is sounding promising :) hope it's within budget! :)
David Frydman
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Post by David Frydman »

You need a robust binocular. 10x50. or the Soviet ones mentioned.
Possibly a 15x70. But the cheap ones are fragile, although fine from a repairer. You must not give them a knock or drop them.
Can he tell you what he has. At least tell him you want them for astronomy. Cosmetic condition not so important. An old coated 10x50 rugged is fine.

David
bewa
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Post by bewa »

I've not had a reply to my second email but he said he would be able to make some recommendations depending on what i wanted to use them for and he would send over full details/specs and pictures! :)

Seems like a nice guy so far!
David Frydman
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Post by David Frydman »

If the repairer had a used Helios 15x70 Stellar binocular that is robust, Japanese made i think and should come in at under £100.
The Zeiss 10x50 Jenoptems seem overpriced nowadays and have poor edge performance.

The 10x 50 Nikon Action has a wide field and aspheric flatter field eyepiece.
£69 new at Sherwoods.

Regards, David

The repairer may have a spotting scope and old but good tripod.
David Frydman
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Post by David Frydman »

For astronomy waterproofing is not necessary.
The main thing is that they stay collimated with regular use and if you take them abroad or on holiday.
A good case is important with extra bubbble wrap if necessary for a not so rugged model.
Chinese binoculars are very variable from a great amount of junk to good or excellent.
Usually a Japanese, German or Russian/Soviet is longer lasting. Also old Korean, Boots chemist binoculars.
The name is important.
Nikon, Minolta, Pentax, Olympus are usually good.
They should not go out of focus when pointed upwards.
A wide field is nicer but an old 5.5 degree 10x50 is O.K. 6, 6.5, 7 or 7.5 degrees is useful if you can see the edge of the field.

David
bewa
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Post by bewa »

cool, i'll let you know what he comes back with :)

Looks like another nice night, it's really nice being out of town especially having such little light pollution!
Whatever i end up getting i'm really hoping to get some good views!
bewa
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Post by bewa »

Hi!

The really nice guy came back with these ones for sale

Bushnell Excursion 8x42
Bushnell H2O 8X42
Bushnell Powerview 10x42

He said he has others as well, with prices ranging upto £120...

He said he's part of the Crewkerne & District Astronomical Society and said really i should just come down and try a few :)

Thoughts? :)
David Frydman
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Post by David Frydman »

The Bushnell 8 x 42 H2O Porroprism are good and low priced new. They are as they say probably waterproof.
I think there is also an 8 x 42 Roof prism.

I will have to look the others up.
I have heard of them both but Bushnell have a huge range from pretty poor to very expensive and maybe very good. Some are just badge engineered Chinese binoculars.
It would be intersting to hear of others.

Does he have any Soviet/Russian or Japanese made rather than Chinese?

Regards, David
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