It is currently Tue Sep 17, 2019 5:17 am


Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 1 post ] 
Author Message
PostPosted: Thu Aug 14, 2008 8:16 am 
Offline

Joined: Fri May 16, 2008 10:09 pm
Posts: 222
Location: Headcorn, Kent, England
***********************************
The SOCIETY for POPULAR ASTRONOMY
***********************************
==================================================
Special Electronic News Bulletin 2008 August 14
==================================================



2008 AUGUST 16 -- PARTIAL LUNAR ECLIPSE
Webcast live from Peter Grego at St Dennis, Cornwall

I will be producing a live webcast of the partial lunar eclipse on the
evening of 16 August on my website www.lunarobservers.com . The
webcast takes place from 19:30 to 22:45 UT (8:30 to 11:45 pm BST).
Images are updated every 20 seconds when live (640x480 resolution).
The umbral phase of the eclipse lasts from 8:36 until 11:44 pm BST.
If the event is clouded out a real-time computer simulation of the
eclipse will be broadcast.

A 4-inch f/6.5 refractor (Celestron NexStar SLT) and a Philips ToUcam
PCVC740K webcam will be used to capture images at the eyepiece using a
tablet PC (ViewSonic 1100) and sent wirelessly from a remote site via
USB broadband wireless modem.



The SPA Electronic News Bulletins are sponsored by the Open University.


Bulletin compiled by Clive Down

(c) 2008 the Society for Popular Astronomy

The Society for Popular Astronomy has been helping beginners to
amateur astronomy -- and more experienced observers -- for 50 years.
If you are not a member then you may be missing something.
Membership rates are extremely reasonable, starting at just £16 a year
in the UK. You will receive our bright quarterly magazine Popular
Astronomy, regular printed News Circulars, help and advice in pursuing
your hobby, the chance to hear top astronomers at our regular
meetings, and other benefits. The best news is that you can join
online right now with a credit card or debit card at our lively
website: http://tinyurl.com/kogyx

If science excites you or if you want to build on a career or existing
qualification, studying with the OU is a way forward. There is a
range of short scientific courses to suit topical interest in the
oceans, astronomy, health, weather etc. Or you might wish to gain a
certificate, diploma, degree in any of the following: physical
sciences, molecular sciences, geosciences, life sciences or natural
sciences. You study in your own time at your own pace, with an
on-line community at your fingertips. http://tinyurl.com/yu44ty

_________________
Kevin Brown, SPA webmaster
My astro blogs.. iya2009.com | Practical Astronomy magazine


Top
 Profile Send private message  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 1 post ] 

All times are UTC


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You can post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group