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PostPosted: Fri Jun 21, 2019 10:57 pm 
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Joined: Fri Dec 03, 2004 12:51 pm
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Location: Stoke-on-Trent
Managed to catch this gorgeous display of noctilucent cloud, overlooking the Trent and Mersey canal on a late night walk. I noticed the display had appeared around 11:00pm, and it is only just dissipating. It was a really beautiful sight. As I stood looking at the scene, there were bats flitting just in front of the camera. There was a beautiful mist just forming above the surface water, which really added to the eeriness of the scene. I feel blessed to have witnessed this tonight.

Best wishes, Jeff.


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14B9F9E5-E6C2-4063-B217-ECC4AAA2B8D0.jpeg
14B9F9E5-E6C2-4063-B217-ECC4AAA2B8D0.jpeg [ 54.42 KiB | Viewed 1267 times ]
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PostPosted: Sat Jun 22, 2019 2:41 am 
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Location: New Farnley, Leeds lat 53.8N long 1.6W
Hello Jeff, as I say elsewhere, the universe is a work of art. Beautiful photo. Kind thoughts, Bob


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PostPosted: Sat Jun 22, 2019 8:50 am 
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Location: Stoke-on-Trent
Thanks Bob. That walk along the canal was spectacular. So peaceful, and those electric blue tendrils were so captivating.

Best wishes, Jeff.


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PostPosted: Sat Jun 22, 2019 9:25 am 
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Joined: Mon Jan 09, 2006 11:05 am
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Location: Lancashire
A superb image and with the bonus of reflection from the canal.

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PostPosted: Sat Jun 22, 2019 11:19 am 
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Joined: Fri Dec 03, 2004 12:51 pm
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Location: Stoke-on-Trent
I’ve been waiting to take an NLC photo from that spot for years :-)

Cheers Brian.


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 23, 2019 5:07 pm 
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Joined: Fri Dec 03, 2004 9:58 pm
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Location: Wellingborough
Great image Jeff. 8)

My recollection of the last few nights has been the Moon rising through thick cloud (cue music "Moonglow" :D )

I have never seen NLC myself in spite of numerous attempts over the last 20 years.....

regards

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52.3N 0.6W
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PostPosted: Sun Jun 23, 2019 9:05 pm 
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Joined: Fri Dec 03, 2004 12:51 pm
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Location: Stoke-on-Trent
Cheers Brian. It seems to be a good year for them. I didn’t see exactly what time this display became visible, but it had all but disappeared within 45 minutes. It took me about 10 minutes to walk from my house to the spot in this photograph, and the change over that time was dramatic. I know how lucky I was to have witnessed this. It will stay in my memory for a very long time.

Best wishes, Jeff.


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 25, 2019 4:49 pm 
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Joined: Fri Dec 10, 2004 10:34 pm
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Location: Surrey
From south of London there was a very bright display but it was very low on the horizon. I did not notice it at the time but my north observatory camera recorded it.

On the morning of the 22nd there was a strong display low down ( below Zeta Per). I thought this was going to develop into a strong display covering the NE sky as the sun got higher but instead it just faded away without increasing in altitude.

It might be something to do with the extent of the NLC or could be normal clouds preventing the NLC being illuminated. (I am not sure how deep in the atmosphere the sunlight can pass and still illuminate NLC ?)


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File comment: NLC morning of 22nd June 2019
In NE below Zeta Per. Display failed to develop

20190622-025654-Small&(C).jpg
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 26, 2019 2:46 pm 
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Normally NLC are visible with the Sun being 6 to 16 degrees below the horizon. I have seen NLC with the Sun only 4.5 degrees below the horizon.
I saw an all sky NLC from Finland, but it only lasted a few minutes and the Sun's angle must have been critical.

I have seen 4 NLC displays in 2019 June, but my view is badly restricted by buildings and trees.

Maggie Daly saw a bright display on June 21 from Lincolnshire.

Regards,
David


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 27, 2019 9:43 am 
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Joined: Fri Dec 10, 2004 10:34 pm
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Location: Surrey
David,

I have had a look at the Meteosat images for the evening of the 21st & morning of the 22nd June and there is no obvious reason for the limited height of the display from where I am located. There was low cloud over East Anglia but the high cloud was over Norway - I would have thought that was too low to impact the illumination of NLC in my direction. I have seen images with NLC quite high up from Paris which is south of me but it is not clear if it was the morning or the evening of the 21st June.

Spaceweather.com has images of extensive coverage from lots of Northern Europe though as the site corrupts the times the images were taken it is difficult to be sure which day / time the NLC were visible.

For instance the NLC over Paris at http://spaceweather.com/archive.php?view=1&day=27&month=06&year=2019 has an exif taken date as ' 2019:06:23 14:53:04'.

It is not clear if the camera date is wrong, spaceweather.com is reading one of the modified dates rather than the image taken date/time. One of the weaknesses in exif data is that it does not include a field for the time zone so one does not know if it is UTC, European Standard Time or European Summer Time.

I try to take some images of a radio controlled clock for the BST time and a GPS for the UTC time at the start / end of a sequence of astro images. That way you can deduce what the camera time is set to and also if you capture a transient event you can correct the camera time to UTC / BST.

John

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PostPosted: Thu Jun 27, 2019 9:59 pm 
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Hi John,
I periodically check my camera times, but I don't take remote images.
My G15 is one minute out.
The A720IS I will have to check.

My viewing site is very poor but I still see some NLC.

NLCs can change in height even for a fixed location for no reason. The NLCs do change, usually slowly, but sometimes quite fast.

There are such fine images and videos nowadays.
When I started I was one of the few to do time lapse photos using 36 exposures on film, say a minute apart.
Minolta SRT 303B 58mm f/1.2 lens. 200ASA or 400ASA colour negative film.
Also for aurora.
I used to meet the BAA director at the British library maybe and hand over the precious uncut rolls of prints in a small box. Now stored at Aberdeen University I think.

Regards,
David


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PostPosted: Fri Jun 28, 2019 7:49 am 
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Joined: Fri Dec 10, 2004 10:34 pm
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Location: Surrey
Hello David,

I use a old Canon 10D facing north controlled by a Raspberry Pi to give an exposure every 30 secs from around 22:00 BST to 23:00 ish. This download the images from the camera when complete leaving me to check them in the morning. Details at http://www.johnmurrell.org.uk/nlc.html if you are interested. I use an old 10D as the number of images will wear the shutter out. I also use a 70D for the early morning shots either from my bedroom window or else a tripod in the garden. I take these manually so not so much shutter wear.

Regards

John

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PostPosted: Fri Jun 28, 2019 3:46 pm 
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Hi John,
My Canon A720 IS took 174,000 individual exposures, before I gave up on it.
The battery/card door has been opened so many times the hinge is worn out.
I can still use it with clear tape to hold the door closed, but I just buy used A720s at £30 with a few thousand shots.
It gives fine A4 prints.
The Canon A650 IS gave good A2 prints, but is bigger.
The A720 IS takes 1.5 seconds from when I see a photo opportunity till getting the shot, including taking the camera out of my pocket.

These 12 year old cameras have a success rate of over 90%.
New cameras 50% maybe.
They don't focus on sky, just hunting. Photos through glass, they focus on the glass.
The AI is stupid, exposures are wrong.
Young folk think that new is better. It isn't.
But camera makers force people into buying their new, new, new cameras.

Regards,
David


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PostPosted: Sat Jun 29, 2019 10:02 am 
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Dear John,
I read your page on NLCs.
For me I find it rather amusing.
I am a simple soul. I don't like or know much about computers.

For me.
NLCs are either there or not there.
I have followed them for 50 years.
I plan nothing in advance.
I record the time to the nearest minute if I see them. My start and finish times.
I realise I usually miss the actual start or finish.

The Canon G15 on programme takes shots of about 1 second at 1600 ISO at f/1.8. Good enough. Stars recorded fainter than unaided eyes stars.
The Konica Minolta Z6 exposures were about 4 seconds at less ISO. Maybe ten years ago. Good photos.

The Minolta SRT 101b and SRT 303b photos were with colour negative.
58mm f/1.4
50mm f/1.4
58mm f/1.2
50mm f/1.2 lenses.

I never use a tripod.
I jam the camera carefully on thick telephone catalogues and secure it with my hand while squeezing the shutter button.
The photos are sharp.
My exposure time is 1 second.
Most of my NLC and Aurora photos are through window glass. Nobody has ever commented on a reduction of quality.
If necessary I gently jam the camera against the window.
I cannot recall ever using a tripod for NLCs of Aurorae.

I used tripods for meteors and comets.

The Minolta XE had speeds to 4 second.
My best photos of Aurorae were taken jammed on my friends car door mirror. Engine stopped. He and his wife still. 65 degrees north. Minus 25C Basically a cooled camera. 4 seconds 58mm f1.2. Sharp no camera movement.

I think that NLCs have now been seen well away from midsummer.
NLCs and aurorae are sometimes seen together.

All the best,
David


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