Northern Lights

Here's the place for any sights you wish to remark on

Moderators: Guy Fennimore, joe, Brian

David Frydman
Posts: 5366
Joined: Mon Jan 18, 2010 9:25 am
Contact:

Northern Lights

Post by David Frydman »

Page 115 Ceefax now.

Meteorwatch predicts aurorae on Monday and Tuesday.

Regards, David
dazcaz
Posts: 236
Joined: Mon Mar 12, 2007 8:05 pm
Location: Cardiff
Contact:

Post by dazcaz »

Really stupid question....
How does one get Ceefax these days? Is it still on analogue?
We're all digital here in Wales :)
I once came last in an astronomy competition.
I was awarded a constellation prize


Skywatcher Explorer 200 HEQ5
Skywatcher Skymax 127 SupaTrak
Celestron C4-R CG-4 mount
David Frydman
Posts: 5366
Joined: Mon Jan 18, 2010 9:25 am
Contact:

Post by David Frydman »

Still Analogue here.
Otherwise I don't know.

Regards, David
astroeddie
Posts: 1116
Joined: Thu Dec 16, 2004 5:06 pm
Location: Hartlepool
Contact:

Post by astroeddie »

Went onto the seafront at 9pm. The sky was very bright, but no definate visible aurorae.
10 30pm, clouded out.
20x80 bins
127 SW Mk
Usual odds an sods
brian livesey
Posts: 5625
Joined: Mon Jan 09, 2006 11:05 am
Location: Lancashire
Contact:

Post by brian livesey »

Impenetrable cloud here, so no chance of observing aurora. It's usually like this in the North-West when there's summat happening! :cry: . Where did I put the Prozac? That's ( gulp ) much better. :lol: :lol: :lol:
brian
mike a feist
Posts: 3303
Joined: Sun May 11, 2008 6:11 pm
Location: Portslade, Sussex Lat 50deg 51min Long 0deg 13mins West
Contact:

Post by mike a feist »

Looked out last evening and then at around 3am early this morning when I had look at Comet Garradd in Hercules again......there was no obvious auroral colours in the sky.........by dawn it was raining. maf
brian livesey
Posts: 5625
Joined: Mon Jan 09, 2006 11:05 am
Location: Lancashire
Contact:

Post by brian livesey »

Why is it that they get more frequent auroral displays in the USA than in the UK?
The UK is closer to the North Pole, whereas America, allowing for Alaska, begins on the latitude of Spain. :?
brian
David Frydman
Posts: 5366
Joined: Mon Jan 18, 2010 9:25 am
Contact:

Post by David Frydman »

They are better situated regarding the North Magnetic Pole is I think the answer.
The Auroral Circle seems to be more favourable to them.
I think one of the most prolific observers lives in Dakota.
Their magnetic latitude is different from the geographical latitude and more favourable.
Pilots frequently see aurorae on Atlantic flights.

I have never seen Aurorae from the U.S. although I spent time there when young. But I probably would not have known what they were if I had seen them.
Also the overall light pollution in such a vast country is probably less than in the crowded U.K. where most of us are plagued with lights.

Regards, David
Davej
Posts: 3288
Joined: Thu Feb 10, 2005 6:12 pm
Location: Sheffield (53° 21' N 1° 12' W)
Contact:

Post by Davej »

Hi,
Been away for a few days but as I was only about thirty miles from the south coast I had no chance even though I had a lovely clear night/early morning and a good northerly view (Sunday night).
Got home yesterday to rain and cloud and again saw nothing last night but have seen reports on local news that Aurora were observed in parts of Yorkshire where it had been clear .. typical :roll:
All the best
Dave
Meade LX 200 (7"). Odyssey 8" Dob.
11X80 10x50 15x70 bins
Celestron Neximage ccd cam
brian livesey
Posts: 5625
Joined: Mon Jan 09, 2006 11:05 am
Location: Lancashire
Contact:

Post by brian livesey »

It's especially frustrating, Dave, when media hype builds up everyone's expectations, as the BBC did last night.
There's so much cloud-coverage in the North-West that, with age and experience, we become fatalistic about the odds of seeing anything at all.
I remember the last transit of Mercury. I had a small refractor with a projection-box set up in the back garden.
It was a glorious day, except for a strip of dark cloud that looked like a vapour trail. It stretched from horizon to horizon, north to south. On either side of the strip was a vast expanse of clear, blue, sky.
When it came time for the transit, you've guessed it, the strip of cloud drifted over the Sun and stayed there for the whole of the transit! :x
brian
PaulB
Posts: 636
Joined: Fri Dec 31, 2004 11:32 am
Location: Macclesfield Cheshire
Contact:

Post by PaulB »

It was seen in North Wales last night.

But as Brian has already stated. It was typically cloudy for most of the North-West last night.

But I am sure their will be plenty more opportunities, during this solar cycle.
Paul Anthony Brierley
Observation Co-ordinator for.
Macclesfield Astronomical Society
https://www.flickr.com/photos/paulabrierley/
http://pabastronomy.blogspot.co.uk/2018/
mike a feist
Posts: 3303
Joined: Sun May 11, 2008 6:11 pm
Location: Portslade, Sussex Lat 50deg 51min Long 0deg 13mins West
Contact:

Post by mike a feist »

In all my observing career from the Sussex coast I missed one auroral display and saw two others which were seen just by chance. I have never succeeded in seeing aurorae as a result of following predictions! maf
Tim Chamberlain
Posts: 231
Joined: Mon Jan 17, 2011 1:35 pm
Location: London, UK.
Contact:

Post by Tim Chamberlain »

I don't suppose I'd have had much chance of seeing it where I live, there's a lot of light pollution near Canary Wharf. I did look out but saw nothing but cloud, which for the last couple of nights has been quite bright in itself. I suppose this is also due to light pollution and the cloud blanket being fairly low.
8x30 (Baigish BPC5, Soviet era) Binocular
8x25 Bak4 Prism (Sun Optical) Binocular
7-21x25 (Helios) Monocular
andybmth

Post by andybmth »

I was in the knew forest away from all the night light pollution looking to see traces of it. you see, i heard on the news it may have been strong enough to be seen in the south. all i got was cold feet. i have never seen it in the uk. i wonder when it will be next due to show up. ill need to head north next time i think. :?

Andrew.
David Frydman
Posts: 5366
Joined: Mon Jan 18, 2010 9:25 am
Contact:

Post by David Frydman »

Maybe 25 years ago in the south of England I saw one of the strongest displays ever, as strong as the really fine displays I have seen in Finland and I have seen very many.

I rang my friends to alert them.

Not only was the display above and coronal, but there was a massive green arc above the SOUTHERN horizon.
I cannot recall but I think it was multicoloured elsewhere and almost all sky.

They have been seen from Chichester and much of France also.

I always look at the Northern sky and I have seen quite a few.

From the New Forest they will not be seen often, but there will be some.

You also have to know what they look like to identify them.

Regards, David
Post Reply