Nova in Cassiopeia

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RMSteele
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Re: Nova in Cassiopeia

Post by RMSteele »

Jeff, great to see you managed to catch the nova. It seems to have faded a bit and I made it mag 8.0 at 2003 UT last night (27th) with my 80mm short focus refractor at x18. This is a really good star to follow precisely because it is so variable on short timescales of a few days. Keep on looking. I wonder what it will do next!
Kind thoughts, Bob
jeff.stevens
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Re: Nova in Cassiopeia

Post by jeff.stevens »

Cheers Bob, I will indeed keep on looking. I found it fascinating last night, thinking about what may be going on with this nova.

I think I laboured too long on making an estimate though. I'm finding it useful to use a bit of averted vision to do a comparison. My naked eye limiting magnitude was much better last night, by about a third of a magnitude.

Best wishes, Jeff.
RMSteele
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Re: Nova in Cassiopeia

Post by RMSteele »

2021 September 29 at 2132 UT. I make the nova mag 7.9 with an 80mm F5 refractor x18 hand held. Bob
RMSteele
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Re: Nova in Cassiopeia

Post by RMSteele »

2021 Oct 03 at 2040 UT. Estimated at mag 7.7 with 80mm F5 refractor x18 hand held. Bob
jeff.stevens
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Re: Nova in Cassiopeia

Post by jeff.stevens »

2021 Oct 3 at 2200 UT. Estimated at magnitude +7.7 using 25x100 binocular.

Definitely brighter than my previous observation. Very tricky using a straight through binocular, even though it was tripod mounted. I was seeing it slightly brighter than the mag +7.8 star HIP 115661 (SAO 20625, HD 220770).

Best wishes, Jeff.
RMSteele
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Re: Nova in Cassiopeia

Post by RMSteele »

2021 Oct 08 at 2100 UT. Estimated at mag 7.8 in 80mm refractor, F5 x18 handheld. Less reliable because of proximity of strong artificial illumination. Bob
RMSteele
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Re: Nova in Cassiopeia

Post by RMSteele »

10/10/21 at 1950 UT, appears to have dipped to mag 8.2 in my 80mm refractor x18. Bob
RMSteele
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Re: Nova in Cassiopeia

Post by RMSteele »

2021 Oct 20 at 1827 UT, I make it mag 7.0 in 80m f5 refractor x18 hand held. It’s brighter once more. Bob
jeff.stevens
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Re: Nova in Cassiopeia

Post by jeff.stevens »

Interesting, Bob. Have you come across any articles discussing these current variations? I haven't had clear enough skies for a long time to attempt an estimate. Each time I go out it seems to be cloudy. This evening might present an opportunity though.

Best wishes, Jeff.
SkyBrowser
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Re: Nova in Cassiopeia

Post by SkyBrowser »

It's a busy wee beastie isn't it! I might have to get a comparison chart and see if it's above the tree line yet.

Here's an AAVSO chart showing its variablility. I suppose there's a sort of general "downwards" trend visible.

Nova Cas.jpg
Nova Cas.jpg (146.39 KiB) Viewed 37 times
RMSteele
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Re: Nova in Cassiopeia

Post by RMSteele »

Hello Jeff, I haven’t seen any articles about the ongoing variations in the nova. It seems to be varying (very) roughly by a magnitude over a period of about a month with spikes up to mag 6 every couple of months. I seem to remember seeing something about the (initial) outburst in this type of nova originating in a large shell of gas accreted around the entire star system from the secondary star. This differs from the classic nova scenario where the outburst happens on or close to the surface of the white dwarf star which has accreted hydrogen from its companion star. There seems be a dearth of information about what is continuing to drive the fluctuations that we are seeing. the initial outburst must have released a tremendous amount of energy into the system’s presumably massive gas envelope. Are we seeing minor outbursts originating in hot spots there? Bob
Last edited by RMSteele on Thu Oct 21, 2021 7:14 pm, edited 2 times in total.
jeff.stevens
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Re: Nova in Cassiopeia

Post by jeff.stevens »

I didn't know that, Bob, so it is a very interesting object indeed. I wonder to what extent professional astronomers are focussing (Edit: no pun intended) on this?

Best wishes, Jeff.
RMSteele
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Re: Nova in Cassiopeia

Post by RMSteele »

Or are we seeing minor recombination events in the gas shell (the May spike was deemed to be a recombination event)? Bob
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Re: Nova in Cassiopeia

Post by RMSteele »

2021 Oct 21 -seems to have dipped a little - mag 7.3 by my estimate at 2230 UT. Bob 80mm x18
RMSteele
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Re: Nova in Cassiopeia

Post by RMSteele »

The nova is down to mag 7.8 again by my estimate on 2021 Oct 24 at 1845 with a hand held 80mm F5 refractor x18. Bob
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