Jupiter

Here's the place for any sights you wish to remark on

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jeff.stevens
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Re: Jupiter

Post by jeff.stevens »

I’ve been out and about, doing some late night walking. It’s a really beautiful evening, and so warm still.

I started off walking a local lane, as it got dark. I love seeing the wildlife that comes out at night. Aside from a lot of toads, young ones getting slightly portlier now, and a few adults, I came across the violet ground beetle, and a devil’s coach horse beetle. Very fine to see, especially the violet ground beetle, for which the colour showed up better on the photo.

Anyway, I digress, rather naughtily, as I was actually also keeping an eye on Jupiter and Saturn. I could see Jupiter through gaps in the trees, but Saturn was teasingly hidden.

By the time I came back, I had to walk to another location that offered better views of the south. It was getting darker, around 9:45pm, when I started taking photographs. Jupiter looks so spectacular at the moment. I didn’t have any optics, other than the camera, but it was just nice to lean on a fence overlooking the scene and watch the night sky. Jupiter is definitely mesmerising at the moment. I wonder what non-astronomers think if they spot this bright point of light?

The camera has picked up 49 and 40 Capricorni, just below Jupiter.

Best wishes, Jeff.
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jeff.stevens
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Re: Jupiter

Post by jeff.stevens »

I spent an hour making a telescopic observation of Jupiter, at 58x magnification using a William Optics refractor.

The seeing wasn’t good, and I had a stable image only for fleeting seconds each time. I thought I was seeing double when I looked at Callisto, and then realised that it was very close to Ganymede. Quite an interesting configuration this evening. I could make out the two main cloud belts on Jupiter, but nothing much else. Quick sketch attached, showing the refractor view - not image corrected.

Towards the end of my observation, Saturn had popped into view from behind the trees, so I had a quick peek at that. Again with poor seeing it was difficult, but the ring system itself was clear enough, along with the gap between the ring system and the planet body. Titan was visible using averted vision.

I also used my 8x56 to spot nova Cass.

Best wishes, Jeff.
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nigeljoslin
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Re: Jupiter

Post by nigeljoslin »

Hello Jeff, sorry to reply so late but I have been on holiday for the last nine days, so there has been no astronomy for me. It's nice to read of your observations and savour the atmospheric photo that you've added.

You are right about nocturnal wildlife being an added attraction of this hobby.

Best wishes,

Nigel
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jeff.stevens
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Re: Jupiter

Post by jeff.stevens »

Thanks Nigel, I hope that you had a good break?

I've not had many viewing opportunities myself since then, due to weather and work. Hopefully it will change soon.

Best wishes, Jeff.
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Re: Jupiter

Post by nigeljoslin »

Yes, we had a good staycation, thanks. I even managed a swim in the sea.

But for now the evening forecasts stretch ahead cloud, cloud, cloud, cloud....> :|
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nigeljoslin
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Re: Jupiter

Post by nigeljoslin »

Enjoyed another look at Jupiter last night between 22:00 BST and 23:00 BST, in slightly unstable air conditions following another warm, humid day. The planet was mushy for much of the time, but during the periods of stability, which each seemed to last for several seconds, it was showing good detail. I was able to take the magnification to a very comfortable 330x, using my Vixen SLV 5mm eyepiece, which yielded lots of belt detail and polar colour graduation. I noticed that the dark brown band at the of the NEB is still very thin and sharply defined, with the large area of white to its north.

I was wondering if there had been any atmospheric changes due to he recent Jovian impact, see https://skyandtelescope.org/astronomy-n ... t-jupiter/, but of course I had no way of telling whether I was looking anywhere near where the impact took place!

Jupiter is a little higher in the sky than it was when I started this thread, I notice.

Saturn was showing decent detail during the still-air interludes, too. The Cassini Division was just discernible as a hairline at 110x, and very nice at 330x.

I finished off my session with some nice craters on the eastern limb of the almost full moon, and studied the many rays that extended from various face-on craters.

Nice to be observing again after a break... :)
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jeff.stevens
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Re: Jupiter

Post by jeff.stevens »

Interesting observations, Nigel. Nothing worse than a 'mushy' Jupiter.

I've been following Jupiter for the past few nights, as we seem to have had a run of slightly hazy skies, but with patches of clear sky around 8pm-10pm, before deteriorating completely.

I'm doing some late evening cycle rides and walks around this time, and it's lovely to see the beacon of light that is Jupiter as I pootle around places. I've just come back from a ride this evening, and stopped to look at Jupiter on occasion in the country lanes. It's an amorphous blob in the slight haze this evening, and Saturn wasn't visible through it. I get a strange sense of comfort from keeping a 'fix' on bright Jupiter during my journeys.

I had a very pleasant 30 minutes of naked eye observing last night, of the Moon, Jupiter and Saturn (attached photograph), and watched the Moon rise from behind some tall trees in the distance. It's very therapeutic just sitting looking up at the night sky on occasions such as this. I was up at around 1am this morning, and could see the Moonlight blazing through the kitchen window. I did a bit of 8x56 observing of the Moon for about 15 minutes, which was very pleasant. I love how Aristarchus stands out, even at full Moon.

Best wishes, Jeff.
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nigeljoslin
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Re: Jupiter

Post by nigeljoslin »

Yes, Aristarchus and Copernicus in all that area of `sea'. I was noticing how smooth some of the maria seemed towards the curve-away of the north eastern limb. It's interesting the subtle role that light angle plays, great expanses of mare looking as smooth as the cheeks of statues.

You are right about Jupiter, Jeff; it is very much a beacon. It must have been a great friend for sailors in days gone by.

Tonight there will be an Io transit, centring at about 21:30 BST. However, I also fear a cloud transit!
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SkyBrowser
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Re: Jupiter

Post by SkyBrowser »

I believe Aristarchus is the brightest spot on the Moon. I avoid observing the Moon when it's full as it's rather tiring on the eyes, and even though there's always a terminator, things can appear very flat at this phase. Of course if there's a good libration bringing Mare Orientale onto the disk I'll take a look anyway!

I should however get my bins onto it and see how many of the "Opera Glass Challenge" features I can add to my list.
nigeljoslin
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Re: Jupiter

Post by nigeljoslin »

I use a double polarising filter on the moon, as indeed I often do on Jupiter. Things do appear relatively flat with a full moon, as you say, but the full moon is good for impressive views of the rays that eminate from various craters.
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brian livesey
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Re: Jupiter

Post by brian livesey »

Look closer Nigel and you’ll notice that many of the crater rays are in fact tangential to the craters, rather than emanating from them.
The rays where formed when material from the crater impact rose, then, fell to the ground, producing secondary clouds of dust that fell and settled tangentially to the crater. It seems that it was the Apollo astronauts who discovered this.
brian
nigeljoslin
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Re: Jupiter

Post by nigeljoslin »

Gosh, Brian, I've just looked at some pictures on the net and indeed many are tangential! I'd never noticed that. Interesting.
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Re: Jupiter

Post by SkyBrowser »

nigeljoslin wrote: Wed Sep 22, 2021 2:45 pm I use a double polarising filter on the moon, as indeed I often do on Jupiter.
I have polarising filters, but I've never thought of using them on Jupiter. Must give it a go!
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Re: Jupiter

Post by nigeljoslin »

It works well, Skybrowser. Adjust to suit!
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jeff.stevens
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Re: Jupiter

Post by jeff.stevens »

I was out observing with my 25x100 binocular this evening. Just before heading back in, I took a quick look at Jupiter. The seeing wasn't particularly good, and I struggled to see any real definition on the disk, which is normally possible with the 25x100. However, I had a good glimpse of the Galilean moons (quick plot attached). It's still very prominent, hovering just above a nearby tree from my viewing location.

Best wishes, Jeff.
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