Search found 48 matches

by nas76
Sun Jan 27, 2008 4:45 pm
Forum: Astrophysics
Topic: Another big bang question
Replies: 5
Views: 3162

I remember reading in Hawking's Brief History of Time that if that if there were minor differences in things such as the charge of an electron the resultant universe would have looked spectacular but there would have been no one to see it. The anthropic principle (spelling?) basically state that if ...
by nas76
Thu Jan 24, 2008 2:45 pm
Forum: General chat
Topic: The man on mars :-)
Replies: 16
Views: 3339

If it was a bit fatter I would swear it was Elvis!!!! :wink: On a serious note, given the size of the original picture I'm not sure what the size of the object is, but an extremely interesting shape at that, but clearly no more than a combination of dark rock and shadow. It's a far, far cry from the...
by nas76
Thu Jan 24, 2008 2:37 pm
Forum: Astrophysics
Topic: Rotation of Galaxies
Replies: 6
Views: 3459

I haven't got time to read the link posted by davep, but surely the direction of rotation of the galaxy has almost everything to do with from which galactical pole side you are looking?
by nas76
Tue Jan 15, 2008 11:08 am
Forum: Light pollution
Topic: Whats the problem?!
Replies: 40
Views: 19758

Even living in a medium sized town the levels of light polution is felt, though luckily due to people's fences and houses street lights are not in my direct line of sight but I cannot see the Milky Way as well as I know would be possible without the polution. I've only recently acquired a telescope ...
by nas76
Mon Jan 14, 2008 2:00 pm
Forum: Absolute beginners
Topic: Does anyone have experience with Celestron's (really poor) c
Replies: 6
Views: 2401

Sale of goods act states that any item sold must be fit for the purpose it was intended. It obviously isn't - so they have to either replace or refund. Malpine is in the USA so a UK law will obviously not apply but I would assume that there is a similar law in the US. Malpine, in the UK if you buy ...
by nas76
Mon Jan 14, 2008 9:35 am
Forum: Astrophysics
Topic: angular momentum
Replies: 10
Views: 5258

Isn't that better known as hydrostatic equilibrium , or is there a difference? Yes you're right I couldn't remember the name when I posted that comment. Thanks all - I didn't realise that the planets slowed down the spin of the Sun. I'm guessing that this is the reason behind the thread starter, if...
by nas76
Sat Jan 12, 2008 2:13 pm
Forum: Astrophysics
Topic: angular momentum
Replies: 10
Views: 5258

RL Astro simply pointed out the gravitational force between the Sun and Jupiter. Going back to the initial question, the Sun is held together by what is known as the stellar equilibrium. This website explains it quite well in layman's terms in the paragraph entitled "Stellar Equilibrium" http://www....
by nas76
Sat Jan 12, 2008 10:56 am
Forum: Astrophysics
Topic: angular momentum
Replies: 10
Views: 5258

Firstly I find this quite a difficult concept to grasp, because this implies that if a star has no planets orbiting it (or another star) then it would disintegrate soon after forming. Secondly whilst most laymen don't appreciate the huge gravitational tug of Jupiter, could it be possible that it can...
by nas76
Sat Jan 12, 2008 10:23 am
Forum: Absolute beginners
Topic: Andromeda galaxy
Replies: 16
Views: 4129

You should however be able to see the planets and some of the star clusters. The pleiades and praesaepe as well as some of the smaller open and globular clusters make good targets. I have lloked at Pleiades, where would I find Praesaepe and I'd be grateful for info about other clusters to look at. ...
by nas76
Wed Jan 09, 2008 9:15 pm
Forum: Absolute beginners
Topic: Finding something interesting :)
Replies: 7
Views: 2550

Hi Jade,

As a newbie too, the first DSO I looked at were the Orion nebulae which are fantastic and Pleiades which is also awe inspiring. I tried then to look for Andromeda (see thread I started in this section) with disappointing results.

Happy star hunting...

Neil
by nas76
Wed Jan 09, 2008 6:22 pm
Forum: Absolute beginners
Topic: Various Questions
Replies: 12
Views: 2774

From what I understand, the Barlow lens is really only useful for looking at the Moon in greater detail and can be used to get a magnified view of Venus, Mars, Jupiter and Saturn, but it is useless for deep sky objects and other faint objects such as Uranus and Ceres, etc.
by nas76
Wed Jan 09, 2008 2:17 pm
Forum: Astrophysics
Topic: Very first audible sounds in the universe
Replies: 17
Views: 8798

Depends upon what you mean by to "hear". In the conventional sense sound travels as longitudinal waves and need a medium with matter to be transmitted such as a solid, a liquid or a dense gas. At the beginning there would in theory been enough matter to transmit sound but as the matter difused then ...
by nas76
Tue Jan 08, 2008 4:01 pm
Forum: Absolute beginners
Topic: Andromeda galaxy
Replies: 16
Views: 4129

Thanks for the prompt replies, to be honest I did not expect text book views but maybe I did expect more than I thought I would. I do know it's 2.2m light years away and that only the core is visible.
by nas76
Tue Jan 08, 2008 3:23 pm
Forum: Absolute beginners
Topic: Andromeda galaxy
Replies: 16
Views: 4129

Andromeda galaxy

Now that I have found my feet a little, and had a couple of clear nights too! I've been trying to focus on the Andromeda galaxy M31 but all I'm getting is a faint blur on a low magnification, I know that the 'scope is properly focused as when I point at Mars or Pleiades I can see sharp images. I bel...
by nas76
Mon Dec 31, 2007 12:09 pm
Forum: Absolute beginners
Topic: Don't laugh
Replies: 12
Views: 3925

Someone will correct me if I'm wrong but Uranus is also visible at the moment, and will be for another few weeks, though I'm not entirely sure where it is currently located. As I'm also a beginner I will probably wait until next Summer when it is visible again before attempting to track it down.