The Moon Guide
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The phase of the Moon right now

Phase
 
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Schools' Moonwatch 2010

   
Aristarchus Credit Peter Grego
Aristarchus, Herodotus and Vallis Schröteri
18 November 2010
As the Moon fills out, two areas of particular note are visible on the 12½-day-old Moon this evening. In Oceanus Procellarum, the Aristarchus plateau is illuminated by the early morning Sun. This geologically diverse area contains many fascinating topographic and albedo features, not to mention its repute for TLP (transient lunar phenomena). Aristarchus (41 km), a young impact crater with deep terraced walls and bright rays dominates the scene. Nearby, its reluctant partner, the low-walled, dark floored Herodotus (36 km), forms a dramatic contrast. To the north can be found Vallis Schröteri (Schröter’s Valley), the Moon’s largest sinuous rille, a feature formed by the action of lava flows. Numerous smaller sinuous rilles slither
Prinz
Prinz
across the plain, especially near the flooded crater Prinz (49 km). On the southern terminator lies Schickard (233 km), a vast crater with a multi-toned floor, along with the conjoined trio of Phocylides (117 km), Nasmyth (80 km) and Wargentin (87 km); the latter looks like a crater that was filled to the brim with lava.

Notes by Peter Grego

Reference map
1 Aristarchus; 2 Prinz; 3 Schickard; 4 Phocylides, Nasmyth and Wargentin.
For a larger map go to http://www.popastro.com/moonwatch/moon_guide/moonmap.html
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Mare Crisium
Mare Crisium

MoonWatch evenings

10–11 November 2010

12 November 2010

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14 November 2010

15 November 2010

16 November 2010

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18 November 2010

Jupiter Watch 2010
 
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