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 Post subject: Russia's rocket problems
PostPosted: Mon Oct 09, 2017 10:07 am 
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It's been sixty years since the launch of sputnik 1 on the R-7 rocket. This rocket, now referred to as the modified Soyuz booster, sent Gagarin into space and, along with the Proton rocket, is still a main workhorse of Russian space launches, which includes ferrying space-crews to the International Space Station.
The Soyuz rocket and the Proton satellite launcher had reputations for reliability, but in recent times there have been a run of launch failures. In 2016, manufacturing faults in rocket engines made for both rockets at the Voronezh plant were found that postponed Proton launches for twelve months. The Russian space agency Roscosmos returned more than seventy engines with faulty parts.
The manufacturing problems have put Russia behind the US and China for commercial satellite launches for the first time. SpaceX has gained from this with its Falcon 9 rocket, which has reduced costs by making the rocket reusable. The manager Igor Komarov at Roscosmos blamed its problems on a logistical failure involving substandard alloys. Russia's new Angara launcher has also been put back and will probably find it difficult to compete with SpaceX launchers.
Russia stands to lose its virtual monopoly to SpaceX's Dragon v2 and Boeing's Starliner crew capsules, that are being tested this year.

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PostPosted: Mon Oct 09, 2017 7:41 pm 
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Silly Question, why cant the UK produce a no frills reliable carrier using recoverable solid fuel strap-ons and a liquid fuel booster? Blob


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PostPosted: Tue Oct 10, 2017 3:58 pm 
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Harold Wilson sold the Blue Streak rocket to the French, who renamed it Ariane.

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PostPosted: Tue Oct 10, 2017 6:51 pm 
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Interesting Brian, well, we're coming out of the EU. Maybe we should have another go at our own product, using private finance of course. I'd buy a few shares. Did you see the Sky at Night interview with the private German concern that's developing a commercial carrier rocket?
Bob


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PostPosted: Tue Oct 10, 2017 9:07 pm 
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It would have been better if we sold Harold Wilson to the French and kept the rocket.

We also gave Stalin three Rolls Royce engines to his amazement.
The Mig 15 resulted, one of the best ever fighters.

We also gave the Miles M.52 supersonic aircraft to the U.S.

The French did produce their own aircraft that travelled up the Channel at 1000mph to our incredulity.
Trident with a rocket at each wingtip in addition to a jet engine.

The French got their own surprise when an SR71 with engine trouble dropped from Mach 3 to subsonic. From 80,000 ft to low. It wasn't supposed to cross France, but normally they couldn't do anything to stop it. It was intercepted by a Mirage, which ordered it to land.
The co-pilot gave the Mirage pilot the finger when they sorted the engines and climbed rapidly up to Mach 3 and the Mirage pilot could only be stunned as they left him standing still even though he tried his best to keep pace.

I doubt we have the money now to produce a good safe rocket.

Regards,
David


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 11, 2017 12:41 pm 
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It would be interesting to know just how robust the SpaceX reusable Falcon 9 rocket is. After landing, how much of the rocket's parts have to be refurbished or replaced?
I read somewhere that a space shuttle's engines, where combustion chamber temperatures reached as high as "boiling iron", were only good for three launches before needing replacement.

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PostPosted: Wed Oct 11, 2017 1:40 pm 
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Yes, Brian,
It's an expensive risky business.

Britain has a history of giving things away or cancelling projects.
The TSR2 was willfully destroyed. Well ahead of the rest of the world.
Aircraft were scrapped when government decided it was only missiles in the future.

We were bankrupt after the 1940s and people wanted a better life, so military spending was cut to completely unsafe levels.
I don't think we have an anti missile protective system.

The idiotic Canadian government were worse.
They were world leaders in aircraft and engines with the Avro Arrow.
In a completely irrational way the programme was cancelled by Diefenbaker and deliberately destroyed.
All the experts went abroad, U.S. (Lockheed, Boeing and NASA), France, and Britain and worked on Concorde and rockets.
Canada has suffered ever since as second rate.

At least France, however disruptive their politicians, keep projects going.
Here they have their heads screwed on properly.

Regards
David.


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 12, 2017 4:01 pm 
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The UK is regarded as being good at designing and building satellites. As you know David, the country's involved with the ESO ( European Space Organisation ) and the ESA ( European Space Agency ).

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PostPosted: Thu Oct 12, 2017 5:31 pm 
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E.S.O. stands for European Southern Observatory.


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 13, 2017 12:17 pm 
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:lol:

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PostPosted: Sat Oct 14, 2017 10:13 am 
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Attached to the ceiling of the astronomy and space-flight gallery at Liverpool's World Museum, we can see a long, gleaming silver, Black Knight rocket. This was an experimental rocket, intended to gather data for communications satellites and for perfecting Blue Streak.
The Black Knight rocket ran on hydrogen peroxide, the exhaust product being water vapour. A 13 metres long Black Arrow rocket was used to launch the UK satellite Prospero. Another one for David!

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